the only one I've ever saw that made sense was an electronics maker-esque kind of deal. if you were getting into messing around with audrinos, raspberry pis, breadboards, etc, it was pretty great. you got a bunch of resistors, leds, jumpers, boards, transistors, capacitors, motors, mini solar panels, etc and a bunch of practical and cool projects to do.
Ok, you all know how much I love board games, and you know that I’m a sucker for subscription boxes, right? Well, Board Game Bento combines both of these loves. Each box includes $80+ worth of games, expansions, and accessories, and they arrive in the mail each month. It’s like a regular built-in game night delivered right to your door! And they’ve got something special happening for the May box…
I called 20min before closing to ask if they would still take a pickup order for sushi, and they kindly helped me out! Ordered 2 Rainbow Rolls, the order was prompt and ready when we came to pickup (within 10min of placing the order!). There was a generous amount of fish on top, nice thick slices of hamachi, tuna, ebi, salmon and halibut. The fish tasted very fresh, rice was well seasoned, the roll fillings were generous and fresh as well ...a quality sushi roll.:) The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout. Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo. You get what you pay for! (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)
I’m a big fan of monster movies, the main reason being how much variety there is in the genre. There’s horror, of course, but even straight up scary movies have different types; like psychological horror or body horror. Movie monsters are often separated by subgenres, and this month’s games definitely capture that idea. To paraphrase a parody of prolific horror film auteur M. Night Shyamalan, what a Twisted Creature!
The box then featured a pair of two-player titles. First up is Super Showdown by Touch Paper Press. The game is about the size of a paperback book, making it easy to pack up and take with you, and features graphics similar to the golden age of comics. The board itself is a square as long as a regular playing card. One takes the role of hero and the other villain as you take turns rolling dice and placing cards down to try and outsmart each other either with the highest card value during confrontations, being the only one at the center of Mayhem or trying to bust your opponent’s card total in a battle of wits. The game just takes a few minutes to learn and set up, and only 10 minutes to get an entire game in, meaning it’s great to use to pass a few minutes, or to use while waiting for the latest hero movie to start.
Honestly May was my first box as well. I was a bit underwhelmed by the theme, and I figured that a copy of Sushi Go would be included. Honestly though I have to admit that I'm pleased with what I got. My daughter and I play Food Fighters almost nightly. It's right on the cusp of being to simplistic for her (she's turning 8) but it's a great game for introducing your child to the concept of strategy without overwhelming them.

Overall, the Final Fantasy series has been critically acclaimed and commercially successful, though each installment has seen different levels of success. The series has seen a steady increase in total sales; it sold over 10 million units worldwide by early 1996,[135] 45 million by August 2003, 63 million by December 2005, and 85 million by July 2008.[136][137][138] In June 2011, Square Enix announced that the series had sold over 100 million units,[139] and by March 2014, it had sold over 110 million units.[140] Its high sales numbers have ranked it as one of the best-selling video game franchises in the industry; in January 2007, the series was listed as number three, and later in July as number four.[46][141] As of 2018, the series has sold over 142 million units worldwide.[142]
Despite having 25% off my subscription, once the cost of shipping and the USD to CAD exchange were applied, I was still paying about $75 Canadian.  Add another 25% to the cost and that is a hefty price tag for some mystery games. It might be more worthwhile if you were purchasing and shipping within the US but I'm not about to recommend it for my Canadian readers.  
Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent, many gameplay elements recur throughout the series.[72][73] Most games contain elements of fantasy and science fiction and feature recycled names often inspired from various cultures' history, languages and mythology, including Asian, European, and Middle-Eastern.[74] Examples include weapon names like Excalibur and Masamune—derived from Arthurian legend and the Japanese swordsmith Masamune respectively—as well as the spell names Holy, Meteor, and Ultima.[73][74] Beginning with Final Fantasy IV, the main series adopted its current logo style that features the same typeface and an emblem designed by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano. The emblem relates to a game's plot and typically portrays a character or object in the story. Subsequent remakes of the first three games have replaced the previous logos with ones similar to the rest of the series.[73]
When you actually do get a seat, the dining room is tiny, but very comfortable. The menu is pretty huge with a lot of different items. In particular, their sushi roll selection is AMAZING! The Surf n Turf Roll, containing Kobe beef and lobster is flavorful and cooked to perfection! The Lemon Roll is very tangy throughout the roll, but very good! The BEST Roll is the Sancho Roll! The jumbo shrimp, blue crab, and seared albacore go perfect with the jalapeño ponzu sauce!
The series affected Square's business on several levels. The commercial failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within resulted in hesitation and delays from Enix during merger discussions with Square.[47][95] Square's decision to produce games exclusively for the Sony PlayStation—a move followed by Enix's decision with the Dragon Quest series—severed their relationship with Nintendo.[3][117] Final Fantasy games were absent from Nintendo consoles, specifically the Nintendo 64, for seven years.[101][118] Critics attribute the switch of strong third-party games like the Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games to Sony's PlayStation, and away from the Nintendo 64, as one of the reasons behind PlayStation being the more successful of the two consoles.[3][117][121] The release of the Nintendo GameCube, which used optical disc media, in 2001 caught the attention of Square. To produce games for the system, Square created the shell company The Game Designers Studio and released Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, which spawned its own metaseries within the main franchise.[38] Final Fantasy XI's lack of an online method of subscription cancellation prompted the creation of legislation in Illinois that requires internet gaming services to provide such a method to the state's residents.[204]
Best vegetarian sushi I have had ever...hands down!! What I love about this place is that we can customize the rolls. Usually tell them how many rolls we want, what veggies we don't want and if we want tempura style or with mayo etc. The rolls come out, always looking different and we have no idea what veggie combo is in them but they are always delicious!!
Overall I'm not really impressed with my box. Yes, I was happy about one of the games but I would have preferred two solid games over one solid and two mediocre games. I don't feel as though I've received a deal since two of the three games are unlikely to be played. I understand that this is the risk you take with mystery boxes but I just don't think Board Game Bento is going to be the right subscription box for me. 
May’s theme is “What’s Cooking.” This means it includes food/cooking-themed games and accessories, and they’ve asked me to write some recipes based on the games to be included in the box! No spoilers, but you’re gonna LOVE the box, and the recipes are all perfect game night snacks/treats. Want to check it out for yourself? You can save $10 off your order with code “HOSTESS”! You only have until May 2nd to sign up for the “What’s Cooking” box, so hustle on over! Check it out at www.boardgamebento.com.

We’ve opened a small share of subscription boxes in this household, and while Board Game Bento is a good value, monetarily speaking, that is a standard feature of subscription boxes and we’ve come to expect it; on the other hand, we have received underwhelming subscription boxes before despite their contents’ cash value, so what usually preoccupies us when we are waiting for them is whether they will pass the “intrinsic value” test—that is, ignoring the contents’ price points, will the box be packed with goodness?   I can tell you that our first Board Game Bento passed this test, as we have already had a wonderful time playing Spyfall, and I am already cogitating strategies for our future play; Salem and Machine of Death look like fun games with unique themes as well, and I have high hopes for them.
I’ve been reluctant to purchase a subscription to Board Game Bento because I already have so many board games at home and I was worried about getting duplicates while spending $60 on a bunch of games I didn’t really want. Don’t get me wrong, I think the idea is a fantastic one but I wasn’t sure if it was right for me, so I followed the Facebook Group for a bit and soon enough I found a theme I could get behind. “The Past”

Board Game Bento’s tag line is “A Box of Board Games Every Month,” with the additional promise that at least $80 worth of games are in every subscription box, and a monthly charge of $50 plus shipping and handling for a single box, or $270 plus shipping and handling for a six month subscription. To the uninitiated tabletop gamer, that could sound pricey, but when you understand that the good tabletop games range from 25 bucks to 75 bucks, with the sweet spot being around $50, you can see that getting a good board game subscription box can be a no-brainer if you are a hardcore gamer.

^ "Video interview with FINAL FANTASY XII Directors". FINAL FANTASY XII Collector's Edition Bonus DVD. Square Enix Co., Ltd. October 31, 2006. Archived from the original on December 6, 2013. Retrieved April 8, 2011. Hiroshi Minagawa: In the course of development, Jun Akiyama and Daisuke Watanabe came up with many ideas but ultimately we had to abandon many of them. I'd heard their original ideas and I wish we could have included them all. Once we began development and many of the systems were in place, the team had many progressive ideas. It was the most enjoyable part of the project. But as we approached the project's end, I had to point out features we had to drop in order for the game to be finished. Which is unfortunate, since I'm sure people would have enjoyed the game that much more if we could have left all our original ideas in.
The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]
I decided not to sub to Bento because of the fact they just blindly send you something. Subscribed to Game Box Monthly instead since Brian actually tries to find something you don't have. I have a prepaid 6 month sub there. My husband also got me AwesomePack for my birthday. After 6 boxes, I'll cancel if they haven't proven to be good fits for us (especially since I got GBM on sale @ 50% discount).
just FYI, a lot of these were in the B&N and gamestop clearance sales. you'll probably be able to pick these up in facebook groups, ebay, and other 2nd hand markets for cheap. I just nabbed portal at gamestop for $18, spyfall 1 & 2 for $7, and I saw a good handful of the rest in the piles when I was perusing hoping to find t.i.m.e stories --I didn't :(
We came in around 9pm on a Saturday night and sat at the sushi bar. The sushi chef's and waiters were friendly. Husband had the calamari, as he is not much of a sushi fan. It was ok...too greasy and was too chewy. Sauce was good though. I had the miso scallop sushi and green mile roll. Both were great and I would get them again. Everything else I saw the chef make looked delicious. A lot of the rolls are tempura shrimp based, while I would have liked to see more of a raw selection.
First time out and I was just whelmed. Came with a group for lunch since we work within walking distance. Based on location, I always figured pricing was going to be on the higher end and my suspisions were correct. I opted for a bento box cause it was moderately priced for a lunch special. Bento box came with chicken katsu, rice, miso soup, tempura, and side salad. Katsu and tempura was pretty dry but at least my water and soup was moist. They get 3 stars for friendly service and clean facilities. If I'm pressed for time and in dire need of sushi I'll come back and give them another shot.
Really enjoyed their happy hour here! Sushi here is pretty expensive but with 40 dollars st happy hour... you can really feed yourself here. My boyfriend and I cane for our monthaversary. Personally, for a Wednesday night it's pretty busy. You're jam packed close to strangers... and for me it... I found myself not enjoying conversing with my boyfriend cause I felt like everyone can here us... like the parties in both sides of us... it doesn't make for a private event at all. I wish the tables were spread out further apart so we could enjoy talking more. But we did manage to stuff our faces with ahi tacos, a spicy tuna hand roll, eel sushi, and a couple of their other special rolls. To be honest, the sushi wasn't that special compared to other places I've been... but the prices were relatively great! On the bright side, the waiters were kind, and the sushi chefs got food to you quickly.
When you actually do get a seat, the dining room is tiny, but very comfortable. The menu is pretty huge with a lot of different items. In particular, their sushi roll selection is AMAZING! The Surf n Turf Roll, containing Kobe beef and lobster is flavorful and cooked to perfection! The Lemon Roll is very tangy throughout the roll, but very good! The BEST Roll is the Sancho Roll! The jumbo shrimp, blue crab, and seared albacore go perfect with the jalapeño ponzu sauce!

In our shipment, unboxed in the video below, you can see exactly what we saw when opening the box. A decent expectation is three games: one “filler” level game (Rocky Road ala Mode), one medium box (Hotshots), and one more mainstream level game (New York 1901). All of the titles are light to medium in terms of difficulty and still relatively new. The box also included one cooperative game which was nice. Overall, it’s easy to see that the games provided are curated and sometimes also have a theme.

The series has inspired numerous game developers. Fable creator Peter Molyneux considers Final Fantasy VII to be the RPG that "defined the genre" for him.[213] BioWare founder Greg Zeschuk cited Final Fantasy VII as "the first really emotionally engaging game" he played and said it had "a big impact" on BioWare's work.[214] The Witcher 3 senior environmental artist Jonas Mattsson cited Final Fantasy as "a huge influence" and said it was "the first RPG" he played through.[215] Mass Effect art director Derek Watts cited Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within as a major influence on the visual design and art direction of the series.[216] BioWare senior product manager David Silverman cited Final Fantasy XII's gambit system as an influence on the gameplay of Dragon Age: Origins.[217] Ubisoft Toronto creative director Maxime Beland cited the original Final Fantasy as a major influence on him.[218] Media Molecule's Constantin Jupp credited Final Fantasy VII with getting him into game design.[219] Tim Schafer also cited Final Fantasy VII as one of his favourite games of all time.[220]
BOARD GAME BENTO is a blind box subscription service for tabletop gaming enthusiasts. Every month, for as low as $45/month plus shipping & handling, subscribers receive at least $80 worth of board games and add-ons at their door step. Each box includes either three different games from three different publishers, or two games and an expansion for one of the included games. The add-ons tie into the month's theme and game content, making the experience of playing a game out of a Board Game Bento box different from playing the same game off the shelf.
Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[131][132] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[133] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[134] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[133] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[115]
The biggest game in the box belongs to Heroes Wanted by Action Phase Games. The game, for one to five players, has players making their heroes using a pair of cards, with strengths and weaknesses, as well as a unique quirk. Players then take on villains, minions and each other to become the hero with the most fame at the end of the game. The game features quite a few scenarios to try as well. Between the scenarios and the variety of heroes you can become, Heroes Wanted will offer quite a bit of replay.

teotihuacan board game

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