I called 20min before closing to ask if they would still take a pickup order for sushi, and they kindly helped me out! Ordered 2 Rainbow Rolls, the order was prompt and ready when we came to pickup (within 10min of placing the order!). There was a generous amount of fish on top, nice thick slices of hamachi, tuna, ebi, salmon and halibut. The fish tasted very fresh, rice was well seasoned, the roll fillings were generous and fresh as well ...a quality sushi roll.:) The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout. Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo. You get what you pay for! (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)
Basically, what Corndance Tavern has done is section off a bit of the restaurant near the Corndance bar and turned it into a mini-restaurant/butcher shop. They have a little cold case with a selection of maybe 10 different meats that are shooting for an upmarket clientele. We're talking 55-day dry-aged beef, which if you know your steak is super difficult to find anywhere, not just South Bend. Alongside that are some nice pork chops and some house-made sausage.
However, unless you have a particularly robust collection or are like several GeekDad contributors (who shall remain nameless) and have a Kickstarter obsession, you’re probably safe. The games are generally from smaller, independent publishers and started out on a crowdfunding platform. Which–to me–makes them all the more exciting. These are games that might not land on “hot” lists but still deserve table time.

If you haven’t played #koboldsatemybaby then you’re missing out on some serious #RPG shenanigans! It’s one of my favorite RPGs to introduce new players to as it’s simple to learn, can be played in a night AND opens players to light and creative collaborative thinking 😊 A fun RPG icebreaker. ❤️ @9thlevelgames . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #roleplayinggame #gamenight #rpgaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #rpgsofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #newgamers #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #beginner #d6system #criticalrole #kidsgames #kobolds

Several individual Final Fantasy games have garnered extra attention; some for their positive reception and others for their negative reception. Final Fantasy VII topped GamePro's "26 Best RPGs of All Time" list,[170] as well as GameFAQs "Best Game Ever" audience polls in 2004 and 2005.[171][172] Despite the success of Final Fantasy VII, it is sometimes criticized as being overrated. In 2003, GameSpy listed it as the seventh most overrated game of all time, while IGN presented views from both sides.[173][174] Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII shipped 392,000 units in its first week of release, but received review scores that were much lower than that of other Final Fantasy games.[175][176][177] A delayed, negative review after the Japanese release of Dirge of Cerberus from Japanese gaming magazine Famitsu hinted at a controversy between the magazine and Square Enix.[178] Though Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within was praised for its visuals, the plot was criticized and the film was considered a box office bomb.[45][46][47][179] Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles for the GameCube received overall positive review scores, but reviews stated that the use of Game Boy Advances as controllers was a big detractor.[117][180] The predominantly negative reception of the original version of Final Fantasy XIV caused then-president Yoichi Wada to issue an official apology during a Tokyo press conference, stating that the brand had been "greatly damaged" by the game's reception.[181]


I’m a big fan of monster movies, the main reason being how much variety there is in the genre. There’s horror, of course, but even straight up scary movies have different types; like psychological horror or body horror. Movie monsters are often separated by subgenres, and this month’s games definitely capture that idea. To paraphrase a parody of prolific horror film auteur M. Night Shyamalan, what a Twisted Creature!


This product is supplied by Ultra Tokyo Connection for orders within the US and in some cases Canada. Supplies from Ultra Tokyo Connection will not have the Japanese licensor sticker as it is part of the manufacturer's North American supply only and not for sale within Japan, but will include proof of distribution by Ultra Tokyo Connection, a subsidiary of Good Smile Company, on the box.
Max is a female pilot with a rocket-fueled cardboard box. If Sky Chasers looks familiar, that’s because it draws from the classic Lunar Lander. Players must operate a pair of thrusters to soar through magical worlds. The inventive levels in Sky Chasers hark back to the days of retro platformers, with bombastic traps, twisting tunnels, and larger-than-life enemies. By earning coins in each world, players can unlock more than two dozen new spaceships, all of which have very distinctive designs.
Following in the successful footsteps of Agar.io, Slither.io is essentially multiplayer Snake for the 21st century. Players begin as small snakes, and they must eat food (i.e. little blobs on the map) to grow. Larger snakes have an easier time trapping smaller ones and making them disappear. When an enemy snake gets trapped, it will become food for others. The simplicity of Slither.io makes it a great choice for quick, fun multiplayer gaming when bored. Plus, a broad selection of neon-colored skins results in eye-catching, pleasing graphics.
Kappa Sushi is located in the busy shopping center containing Trader Joe's and Board n Brew. This sushi restaurant is crowded nearly every evening of the week and the seating is extremely limited (about 50 people max). When checking in to the hostess booth, there is no waiting area. So, if there's a wait and it's cold outside, you have to wait in the cold like a hobo. When you actually do get a seat, the dining room is tiny, but very comfortable. The menu is pretty huge with a lot of different items. In particular, their sushi roll selection is AMAZING! The Surf n Turf Roll, containing Kobe beef and lobster is flavorful and cooked to perfection! The Lemon Roll is very tangy throughout the roll, but very good! The BEST Roll is the Sancho Roll! The jumbo shrimp, blue crab, and seared albacore go perfect with the jalapeño ponzu sauce! The Spicy Garlic Edamame was a miss as the sauce tasted very watered down and bland. The prices of the rolls range from $10-$16, so a little on the pricey side... but the fresh delicious ingredients make it worth it. I'd come back just for the Sancho Roll and order 3 of them! They have an awesome happy hour too! 5 stars overall!

World’s Fair 1983 by Renegade/Foxtrot Games: When When I opened the box I was very excited to see this game. It was their advertised Mensa Select Game and  it’s made by a publisher I love (they make Lanterns and Lotus). On top of that it scored extra points in my book because it was on my “want list” but not yet in my collection. Whomever picked this game out for the Bento Box certainly deserves a crisp high five as it is a gem.
Chris Spires, Doug Smidebush, Lior Keinan , Kelvin Nduka, Thad Standley, Nolan Zak, Adam Franks, Stephen Brown, Loren Roberts, Matt and Nykki Boersma, Tom Morgan, Jack Everitt, John Kovalic, Seiler Hagan, Jess Hart, Will James, Christopher M. Kelly, Roberto L. Vargas, Michele Hall, Chuck Lawton, Ismael Schonhorst, (There are those who call him) Tim, Vladimir Weinstein, Randiman Rogers, Robert Booth, Henry Roenke, Kevin Culp, W. David MacKenzie, Nicholas Richards, John Idlor, Michael Fox, Rob H., Matthew Cody, Dan Callahan, Patrick Kohn, Seth Phillips, Kevin Korpi, Ben MS, Monica, Mark Gonyea, Pharlain Ross, Derick Larson, Furstarter.com
Where I think Board Game Bento should be headed, if they really want to shine in this industry, is by offering home delivery of the newest  board games released each month. Then you wouldn’t have to do all the research, driving or internet shopping to find what’s hot. They would just be waiting for you in the mailbox each month and I feel like many veteran gamers, like myself, would defiantly pay for that service.
I’m a big fan of monster movies, the main reason being how much variety there is in the genre. There’s horror, of course, but even straight up scary movies have different types; like psychological horror or body horror. Movie monsters are often separated by subgenres, and this month’s games definitely capture that idea. To paraphrase a parody of prolific horror film auteur M. Night Shyamalan, what a Twisted Creature!

Three Final Fantasy installments were released on the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Final Fantasy was released in Japan in 1987 and in North America in 1990.[2][3] It introduced many concepts to the console RPG genre, and has since been remade on several platforms.[3] Final Fantasy II, released in 1988 in Japan, has been bundled with Final Fantasy in several re-releases.[3][4][5] The last of the NES installments, Final Fantasy III, was released in Japan in 1990;[6] however, it was not released elsewhere until a Nintendo DS remake in 2006.[5]
Board Game Bento, today’s sponsor, has a different theme each month, and they guarantee at least $80 worth of games and accessories in each box. A monthly subscription (with no commitment and the ability to cancel anytime) will set you back $50 + s/h. Committing to a six-month subscription reduces that price a bit. So it’s pricier than the comic book version (and many other monthly subscription boxes), which obviously means you’re taking more of a risk.

wingspan board game

×