As for the quality of the games, they appear to come from experienced publishers. None of the games included generally have stellar ratings, but we would not call any of the titles “bad” games. They’re not the cream of the gaming crop, but they also don’t appear to be games that would get seriously negative ratings from us. That being said, one month’s game box included Walled City: Londonderry and Borderlands which happens to be one of my favorite games of all time.

Planet Surprise by Notre Game is a scratch and play, disposable game, much like scratch-off lottery tickets. I love playing scratch-off tickets, so I was intrigued, however, this one fell flat for me. Gianna and I tried this one and we both felt the same - it’s an interesting concept, but we didn’t feel it had any strategy involved or any real benefit to playing it against other people.

High Noon Saloon by Slug Fest Games: I enjoy a lot of Red Dragon Inn but I hadn’t heard of this one before. Luckily for me I have someone in the house who loves westerns, so the game was well received. After opening it I wasn’t super impressed with the bits but after doing a little more research I was happy to see it got a decent BGG rating. Which was a huge plus for a game I hadn’t heard of before that was published five years ago. I’m really hoping this game will be a diamond in the rough.


I did notice one card in particular that I found quite over powering. The card allows you to play two extra water balloons on your turn, which can be enough to wash out 1 to 2 kids on the first turn of the game. Not really ideal in a two player game for sure. One could argue that this card is balanced by the card that allows you to have a washed out kid return to your team dry, but this relies heavily on luck.
I've been wanting to make a chit puller for Dirtside II, but my programming experience is mostly in Visual BASIC, and I haven't had the time to sit down and learn Objective-C or Cocoa Touch or Snow Tiger or Buttered Monkey or whatever it's called this week. I think once I learned the syntax, I could do a reasonably competent job, because I've already worked out all the logic behind the chit puller; I just need to translate that into Obj-C code.
The Green Mile and Kappa Monster rolls are my favorites, with honorable mention to the Lemon roll and El Diablo. I do want to mention, in some of their rolls they use real blue crab not the fake Krab meat you find at other places, it has a different look and flavor. My boyfriend found it "too fishy" and thought it was spoiled Krab meat or something but he doesn't have the most refined of palates. Just keep in mind that it'll have a "fishier" flavor in case that's not your thing. I personally loved it.
PBL Robots was also a neat surprise. To anyone that likes to play things like Battletech and such, this game is a winner. Players start with a pilot and construct the robot. This is all done with cards and the goal is to destroy your opponent’s robot. On your turn, players can either build or attack, so you have to manage your priorities in order to succeed. Robots is a keeper, for sure.
Several video games have either been adapted into or have had spin-offs in the form of manga and novels. The first was the novelization of Final Fantasy II in 1989, and was followed by a manga adaptation of Final Fantasy III in 1992.[62][63] The past decade has seen an increase in the number of non-video game adaptations and spin-offs. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within has been adapted into a novel, the spin-off game Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles has been adapted into a manga, and Final Fantasy XI has had a novel and manga set in its continuity.[64][65][66][67] Seven novellas based on the Final Fantasy VII universe have also been released. The Final Fantasy: Unlimited story was partially continued in novels and a manga after the anime series ended.[68] The Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XIII series have also had novellas and audio dramas released. Two games, Final Fantasy Tactics Advance and Final Fantasy: Unlimited, have been adapted into radio dramas.
Investigate, the theme of May’s Board Game Bento, is not unknown to tabletop gamers, whether the classic mansion setting of Clue, or the psychic detectives in the seance simulator, Mysterium, or the more direct dungeon delving and looting of Dungeons & Dragons. In a way, every subscription box promises a mystery, so the Investigate themed Board Game Bento is the most sincere subscription box of them all, admitting to the opener that it is, indeed, a Schrodinger’s Cat of unknown contents—unless, of course, the user has sought spoilers on Google or unboxing videos on YouTube prior to its arrival.  On that note, if you’re a subscriber and you haven’t received your Board Game Bento this month, be aware that spoilers lie below, and proceeding would be like peeking in the Clue envelope.

Planet Surprise by Notre Game is a scratch and play, disposable game, much like scratch-off lottery tickets. I love playing scratch-off tickets, so I was intrigued, however, this one fell flat for me. Gianna and I tried this one and we both felt the same - it’s an interesting concept, but we didn’t feel it had any strategy involved or any real benefit to playing it against other people.

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