World’s Fair 1983 by Renegade/Foxtrot Games: When When I opened the box I was very excited to see this game. It was their advertised Mensa Select Game and  it’s made by a publisher I love (they make Lanterns and Lotus). On top of that it scored extra points in my book because it was on my “want list” but not yet in my collection. Whomever picked this game out for the Bento Box certainly deserves a crisp high five as it is a gem.
Investigate, the theme of May’s Board Game Bento, is not unknown to tabletop gamers, whether the classic mansion setting of Clue, or the psychic detectives in the seance simulator, Mysterium, or the more direct dungeon delving and looting of Dungeons & Dragons. In a way, every subscription box promises a mystery, so the Investigate themed Board Game Bento is the most sincere subscription box of them all, admitting to the opener that it is, indeed, a Schrodinger’s Cat of unknown contents—unless, of course, the user has sought spoilers on Google or unboxing videos on YouTube prior to its arrival.  On that note, if you’re a subscriber and you haven’t received your Board Game Bento this month, be aware that spoilers lie below, and proceeding would be like peeking in the Clue envelope.

Biggs and Wedge, inspired by two Star Wars characters of the same name, appear in numerous games as minor characters, sometimes as comic relief.[23][73] The later games in the series feature several males with effeminate characteristics.[80][81] Recurring creatures include Chocobos and Moogles.[23] Chocobos are large, often flightless birds that appear in several installments as a means of long-distance travel for characters. Moogles, on the other hand, are white, stout creatures resembling teddy bears with wings and a single antenna. They serve different capacities in games including mail delivery, weaponsmiths, party members, and saving the game. Chocobo and Moogle appearances are often accompanied by specific musical themes that have been arranged differently for separate games.[3][23][73] Final Fantasy is also well known for its enemy monsters and creatures.[82]
Recently, we received a sample subscription box from Board Game Bento (provided for us to review). The package comes monthly in a colorful box with a small collection of games. There’s a description of the specifics on their web site, but the basics are that for $50 a month you get an assortment of games set to you each month. Overall, it’s a very straightforward concept.

I’ve looked at monthly game services before, and have never really been tempted because the range of things you receive in the shipments was too wide. Let’s consider the Magic ones, for example. I would only want those for the cards and not the miscellaneous other things (bobble heads, toys, etc.). Board Game Bento promises at least three games in each box. They got my attention.
Your buying a present for yourself and it includes the surprise. Them saying a value is them trying to make sure your happy with your present. Its like getting a gift in a secret santa for work or from a distant relative, they want to get you something that you'll like but they don't actually know you well enough to get you something that you'd ask for.
In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[93][94][95] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[94][96] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[97]
the only one I've ever saw that made sense was an electronics maker-esque kind of deal. if you were getting into messing around with audrinos, raspberry pis, breadboards, etc, it was pretty great. you got a bunch of resistors, leds, jumpers, boards, transistors, capacitors, motors, mini solar panels, etc and a bunch of practical and cool projects to do.

root board game


Overall I'm not really impressed with my box. Yes, I was happy about one of the games but I would have preferred two solid games over one solid and two mediocre games. I don't feel as though I've received a deal since two of the three games are unlikely to be played. I understand that this is the risk you take with mystery boxes but I just don't think Board Game Bento is going to be the right subscription box for me. 
There is a classic episode of GI Joe, in which Dusty the desert trooper and another Joe (I want to say Recondo) were sitting on a sand dune. The sweaty other Joe asked Dusty how he can stand this heat. Dusty - lying comfortably in the sand - says: “Just stay still and think cool thoughts.” That advice can be flipped and used to get through a cold, grey winter. Just break out any of this month's games and imagine you're having FUN IN THE SUN!
Board Game Bento is a monthly subscription box for board gamers. I've never subscribed before but since there was a 25% off coupon for December and I wanted to treat myself for Christmas, I decided I would try out a one month subscription. The weather has been pretty yucky and the theme of the box was "Fun in the Sun; Not Sports 2" so I figured some summer games would be a good way to start off the new year. The box did end up being delayed due to weather, of course, but arrived late last week. 

Ben Hsu, Richard Bliss, Uncle Doug MacDonand, Brian Colin, Peter Smyth, Mark Buffington, Josh H., Propelstalz, Mary Crocker, Wayne Moulton Jr, Mitch Gross, Jim Valko, Andrew Brown, Lucy Ravitch, Nicholas Duresky, Heather Hofshi, John Kemp, Thorsten Karge, Natasha Dzurny, Keith Ives, Benjamin Chan, Neal Bhatnagar, Justin Farr, Regan Lee, Elaine, Nate Fugal, Stephanie Tennison, Jon Rasmussen, Ryan Pulis, Owen Duffy, Colman Reilly, Anthony, Mark Richman, Alexis Ohanian, Steve, Greg “TVsEgon” Skinner, Andy Saavedra, Daniel, Willie Raymond Taylor III, Chad Ingham, Irene Christian, Clinton Richmond, Jamey Stegmaier, James Allenspach, John Howell, Leif Terry, Tiago Pereira, Nathan Heath, Grinidon, Roman, Berserker Hew, Clark Stacey, Ben Harkins, Kayvaan Ghassemieh, Travis B., Justin Myers, Magna Nordgard, Jim Griffin, Jeff, David Smith, Matthew Titelbaum, Dennis Hitzeman, Daniel Lieske, Michael Jantze, Ruddy, Tom Damico, Kelson, Michelangelo Grigni
Writers for Board Game Quest are occasionally asked to evaluate a product that we might not be the main consumers for. In the case of a board game subscription service, receiving a monthly drop of board games is something we’re familiar with as a matter of course. For gamers out there paying for this type of service, you probably want to know what to expect.
I’m a big fan of monster movies, the main reason being how much variety there is in the genre. There’s horror, of course, but even straight up scary movies have different types; like psychological horror or body horror. Movie monsters are often separated by subgenres, and this month’s games definitely capture that idea. To paraphrase a parody of prolific horror film auteur M. Night Shyamalan, what a Twisted Creature!
The central conflict in many Final Fantasy games focuses on a group of characters battling an evil, and sometimes ancient, antagonist that dominates the game's world. Stories frequently involve a sovereign state in rebellion, with the protagonists taking part in the rebellion. The heroes are often destined to defeat the evil, and occasionally gather as a direct result of the antagonist's malicious actions.[3][74] Another staple of the series is the existence of two villains; the main villain is not always who it appears to be, as the primary antagonist may actually be subservient to another character or entity.[3] The main antagonist introduced at the beginning of the game is not always the final enemy, and the characters must continue their quest beyond what appears to be the final fight.[74]

I originally wasn't going to subscribe for this one as the theme didn't really interest me, but a discount offer, the mention that this box would have over $100 worth of games, and the hint that one of the games was a Spiel des Jahres nominee got me to give in. Based on the month's theme, I thought the SdJ nominee would've been Codenames or less likely, T.I.M.E. Stories. Alas, the "nominee" was Spyfall. Overall, I'm not very excited about this box as I don't play these types of games, though Salem looks interesting.

hail hydra board game

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