I'm not a SD local - I'm from the LA area. What I do know is I've had quality sushi and sashimi and it's not here. The reviews are good but I personally was not satisfied or happy with the food I received. Service is good. Servers are polite and the restaurant itself has a nice ambience. Price is typical for a sushi place - it's fish so it's going to be expensive. I got the spicy garlic edamame, 2 piece salmon sushi, and Tazmanian Devil roll. The edamame and sushi were good - that's why I'm giving a 2 star review.. a star for each. The roll was not good. The spicy tuna in it was flavorless and when I took my first bite I questioned if the tuna was rancid. It wasn't rancid, just flavorless and bad quality. The roll was drenched in what seemed like vinegar and that didn't help the taste. I was thoroughly underwhelmed and if you've had quality AYCE or sushi, don't come here. I had some of my wife's CA roll and it was just alright. Not recommended unless you're in a pinch and have nowhere else to eat.
May’s theme is “What’s Cooking.” This means it includes food/cooking-themed games and accessories, and they’ve asked me to write some recipes based on the games to be included in the box! No spoilers, but you’re gonna LOVE the box, and the recipes are all perfect game night snacks/treats. Want to check it out for yourself? You can save $10 off your order with code “HOSTESS”! You only have until May 2nd to sign up for the “What’s Cooking” box, so hustle on over! Check it out at www.boardgamebento.com.
Investigate, the theme of May’s Board Game Bento, is not unknown to tabletop gamers, whether the classic mansion setting of Clue, or the psychic detectives in the seance simulator, Mysterium, or the more direct dungeon delving and looting of Dungeons & Dragons. In a way, every subscription box promises a mystery, so the Investigate themed Board Game Bento is the most sincere subscription box of them all, admitting to the opener that it is, indeed, a Schrodinger’s Cat of unknown contents—unless, of course, the user has sought spoilers on Google or unboxing videos on YouTube prior to its arrival.  On that note, if you’re a subscriber and you haven’t received your Board Game Bento this month, be aware that spoilers lie below, and proceeding would be like peeking in the Clue envelope.
I called 20min before closing to ask if they would still take a pickup order for sushi, and they kindly helped me out! Ordered 2 Rainbow Rolls, the order was prompt and ready when we came to pickup (within 10min of placing the order!). There was a generous amount of fish on top, nice thick slices of hamachi, tuna, ebi, salmon and halibut. The fish tasted very fresh, rice was well seasoned, the roll fillings were generous and fresh as well ...a quality sushi roll.:) The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout. Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo. You get what you pay for! (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)
Board Game Bento’s tag line is “A Box of Board Games Every Month,” with the additional promise that at least $80 worth of games are in every subscription box, and a monthly charge of $50 plus shipping and handling for a single box, or $270 plus shipping and handling for a six month subscription. To the uninitiated tabletop gamer, that could sound pricey, but when you understand that the good tabletop games range from 25 bucks to 75 bucks, with the sweet spot being around $50, you can see that getting a good board game subscription box can be a no-brainer if you are a hardcore gamer.
Overall I have to say I wasn’t disappointed with what I got. I was lucky enough not to get any duplicate games for my collection and one of the games was on my “to buy” list. I was also happy that these games came from game companies that I already like  to purchase from and were rated pretty well on Board Game Geek, however we have to talk about the “bad stuff” too.
just FYI, a lot of these were in the B&N and gamestop clearance sales. you'll probably be able to pick these up in facebook groups, ebay, and other 2nd hand markets for cheap. I just nabbed portal at gamestop for $18, spyfall 1 & 2 for $7, and I saw a good handful of the rest in the piles when I was perusing hoping to find t.i.m.e stories --I didn't :(
I did notice one card in particular that I found quite over powering. The card allows you to play two extra water balloons on your turn, which can be enough to wash out 1 to 2 kids on the first turn of the game. Not really ideal in a two player game for sure. One could argue that this card is balanced by the card that allows you to have a washed out kid return to your team dry, but this relies heavily on luck.

The game indeed reversed Square's lagging fortunes, and it became the company's flagship franchise.[46][94] Following the success, Square immediately developed a second installment. Because Sakaguchi assumed Final Fantasy would be a stand-alone game, its story was not designed to be expanded by a sequel. The developers instead chose to carry over only thematic similarities from its predecessor, while some of the gameplay elements, such as the character advancement system, were overhauled. This approach has continued throughout the series; each major Final Fantasy game features a new setting, a new cast of characters, and an upgraded battle system.[5] Video game writer John Harris attributed the concept of reworking the game system of each installment to Nihon Falcom's Dragon Slayer series,[98] with which Square was previously involved as a publisher.[99] The company regularly released new games in the main series. However, the time between the releases of Final Fantasy XI (2002), Final Fantasy XII (2006), and Final Fantasy XIII (2009) were much longer than previous games. Following Final Fantasy XIV, Square Enix stated that it intended to release Final Fantasy games either annually or biennially. This switch was to mimic the development cycles of Western games in the Call of Duty, Assassin's Creed and Battlefield series, as well as maintain fan-interest.[100]

Rick has locked the family inside their house. Why? Because the family has grown. Parasites masquerading as family and close friends have infiltrated and have inserted pleasant memories into everyone's minds to make them think they're real — and more keep coming! You must figure out which of these new, zany characters are real and which ones are parasites that need to be exterminated. Think you've got what it takes to save the world?

The series' popularity has resulted in its appearance and reference in numerous facets of popular culture like anime, TV series, and webcomics.[205][206][207] Music from the series has permeated into different areas of culture. Final Fantasy IV's "Theme of Love" was integrated into the curriculum of Japanese school children and has been performed live by orchestras and metal bands.[208] In 2003, Uematsu co-founded The Black Mages, a instrumental rock group independent of Square that has released albums of arranged Final Fantasy tunes.[209][210] Bronze medalists Alison Bartosik and Anna Kozlova performed their synchronized swimming routine at the 2004 Summer Olympics to music from Final Fantasy VIII.[143] Many of the soundtracks have also been released for sale. Numerous companion books, which normally provide in-depth game information, have been published. In Japan, they are published by Square and are called Ultimania books.[211][212]
Recently, we received a sample subscription box from Board Game Bento (provided for us to review). The package comes monthly in a colorful box with a small collection of games. There’s a description of the specifics on their web site, but the basics are that for $50 a month you get an assortment of games set to you each month. Overall, it’s a very straightforward concept.
I had the charcuterie board and every single thing on it was delicious. My favorite bites were the pork comfit, the terrine and last but not least was a small bite of Lardo. Lardo is a cured slice of fat from prosciutto. I first had this on a trip to Florence, Italy and its only available there for a short time in the spring. It is wonderful spread on a piece of toasted bread.

I originally wasn't going to subscribe for this one as the theme didn't really interest me, but a discount offer, the mention that this box would have over $100 worth of games, and the hint that one of the games was a Spiel des Jahres nominee got me to give in. Based on the month's theme, I thought the SdJ nominee would've been Codenames or less likely, T.I.M.E. Stories. Alas, the "nominee" was Spyfall. Overall, I'm not very excited about this box as I don't play these types of games, though Salem looks interesting.

hail hydra board game

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