BOARD GAME BENTO is a blind box subscription service for tabletop gaming enthusiasts. Every month, for as low as $45/month plus shipping & handling, subscribers receive at least $80 worth of board games and add-ons at their door step. Each box includes either three different games from three different publishers, or two games and an expansion for one of the included games. The add-ons tie into the month's theme and game content, making the experience of playing a game out of a Board Game Bento box different from playing the same game off the shelf.
The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout.  Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo.  You get what you pay for!  (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)

I'd often considered getting this, but the few unboxings I'd seen left me unimpressed. Now that I've seen their entire history? Thank god I never spent my money on them. There's a small handful of games I'd actually want to play, a bunch of games I know I'd play once, say "that was cute" and then never pull off the shelf, and a TON of bottom of the barrel garbage games.
Ordered 2 Rainbow Rolls, the order was prompt and ready when we came to pickup (within 10min of placing the order!).  There was a generous amount of fish on top, nice thick slices of hamachi, tuna, ebi, salmon and halibut.  The fish tasted very fresh, rice was well seasoned, the roll fillings were generous and fresh as well ...a quality sushi roll.:)
I had the charcuterie board and every single thing on it was delicious. My favorite bites were the pork comfit, the terrine and last but not least was a small bite of Lardo. Lardo is a cured slice of fat from prosciutto. I first had this on a trip to Florence, Italy and its only available there for a short time in the spring. It is wonderful spread on a piece of toasted bread.

I should have done a better job paying attention to what he was ordering, but everything we had was good! We started with some sashimi and nigiri items (including lobster tail and uni), then several rolls. My bro's favorite is the spam and eggs. For our 10-month old baby, we ordered her the avocado tempura and gyoza. She was having a great time enjoying her dishes!
Overall I have to say I wasn’t disappointed with what I got. I was lucky enough not to get any duplicate games for my collection and one of the games was on my “to buy” list. I was also happy that these games came from game companies that I already like  to purchase from and were rated pretty well on Board Game Geek, however we have to talk about the “bad stuff” too.

As I said, Board Game Bento guarantees at least an $80 value. The four games in this particular box retail for about $100. Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?


PBL Robots was also a neat surprise. To anyone that likes to play things like Battletech and such, this game is a winner. Players start with a pilot and construct the robot. This is all done with cards and the goal is to destroy your opponent’s robot. On your turn, players can either build or attack, so you have to manage your priorities in order to succeed. Robots is a keeper, for sure.
Board Game Bento, today’s sponsor, has a different theme each month, and they guarantee at least $80 worth of games and accessories in each box. A monthly subscription (with a month-to-month commitment and the ability to cancel anytime) will set you back $50 + s/h. Committing to a six-month subscription reduces that price a bit. So this box is pricier than the comic book version (and many other monthly subscription boxes), which obviously means you’re taking more of a risk. 

reef board game


The biggest game in the box belongs to Heroes Wanted by Action Phase Games. The game, for one to five players, has players making their heroes using a pair of cards, with strengths and weaknesses, as well as a unique quirk. Players then take on villains, minions and each other to become the hero with the most fame at the end of the game. The game features quite a few scenarios to try as well. Between the scenarios and the variety of heroes you can become, Heroes Wanted will offer quite a bit of replay.


Final Fantasy has spawned numerous spin-offs and metaseries. Several are, in fact, not Final Fantasy games, but were rebranded for North American release. Examples include the SaGa series, rebranded The Final Fantasy Legend, and its two sequels, Final Fantasy Legend II and Final Fantasy Legend III.[38] Final Fantasy Mystic Quest was specifically developed for a United States audience, and Final Fantasy Tactics is a tactical RPG that features many references and themes found in the series.[39][40] The spin-off Chocobo series, Crystal Chronicles series, and Kingdom Hearts series also include multiple Final Fantasy elements.[38][41] In 2003, the Final Fantasy series' first direct sequel, Final Fantasy X-2, was released.[42] Final Fantasy XIII was originally intended to stand on its own, but the team wanted to explore the world, characters and mythos more, resulting in the development and release of two sequels in 2011 and 2013 respectively, creating the series' first official trilogy.[28] Dissidia Final Fantasy was released in 2009, a fighting game that features heroes and villains from the first ten games of the main series.[43] It was followed by a prequel in 2011.[44] Other spin-offs have taken the form of subseries—Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, Ivalice Alliance, and Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy.
Despite having 25% off my subscription, once the cost of shipping and the USD to CAD exchange were applied, I was still paying about $75 Canadian.  Add another 25% to the cost and that is a hefty price tag for some mystery games. It might be more worthwhile if you were purchasing and shipping within the US but I'm not about to recommend it for my Canadian readers.  
When you actually do get a seat, the dining room is tiny, but very comfortable. The menu is pretty huge with a lot of different items. In particular, their sushi roll selection is AMAZING! The Surf n Turf Roll, containing Kobe beef and lobster is flavorful and cooked to perfection! The Lemon Roll is very tangy throughout the roll, but very good! The BEST Roll is the Sancho Roll! The jumbo shrimp, blue crab, and seared albacore go perfect with the jalapeño ponzu sauce!
Board Game Bento, today’s sponsor, has a different theme each month, and they guarantee at least $80 worth of games and accessories in each box. A monthly subscription (with a month-to-month commitment and the ability to cancel anytime) will set you back $50 + s/h. Committing to a six-month subscription reduces that price a bit. So this box is pricier than the comic book version (and many other monthly subscription boxes), which obviously means you’re taking more of a risk.
In our shipment, unboxed in the video below, you can see exactly what we saw when opening the box. A decent expectation is three games: one “filler” level game (Rocky Road ala Mode), one medium box (Hotshots), and one more mainstream level game (New York 1901). All of the titles are light to medium in terms of difficulty and still relatively new. The box also included one cooperative game which was nice. Overall, it’s easy to see that the games provided are curated and sometimes also have a theme.
We played Spyfall in our most recent game night, and you’ll see this week’s Game Night recap as well as a formal review of the game later on Board of Life. Suffice to say that we couldn’t have been more excited to learn this game, which we discovered has a very interesting dual dynamic: if you’re not the spy that round, you have to “find your crew” as fast as possible by tipping them off without tipping off the spy; if you’re the spy, you’re in the dark and must gather your intelligence before the rest of the group realizes who is the odd man (or woman) out.
Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent, many gameplay elements recur throughout the series.[72][73] Most games contain elements of fantasy and science fiction and feature recycled names often inspired from various cultures' history, languages and mythology, including Asian, European, and Middle-Eastern.[74] Examples include weapon names like Excalibur and Masamune—derived from Arthurian legend and the Japanese swordsmith Masamune respectively—as well as the spell names Holy, Meteor, and Ultima.[73][74] Beginning with Final Fantasy IV, the main series adopted its current logo style that features the same typeface and an emblem designed by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano. The emblem relates to a game's plot and typically portrays a character or object in the story. Subsequent remakes of the first three games have replaced the previous logos with ones similar to the rest of the series.[73]
The series affected Square's business on several levels. The commercial failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within resulted in hesitation and delays from Enix during merger discussions with Square.[47][95] Square's decision to produce games exclusively for the Sony PlayStation—a move followed by Enix's decision with the Dragon Quest series—severed their relationship with Nintendo.[3][117] Final Fantasy games were absent from Nintendo consoles, specifically the Nintendo 64, for seven years.[101][118] Critics attribute the switch of strong third-party games like the Final Fantasy and Dragon Quest games to Sony's PlayStation, and away from the Nintendo 64, as one of the reasons behind PlayStation being the more successful of the two consoles.[3][117][121] The release of the Nintendo GameCube, which used optical disc media, in 2001 caught the attention of Square. To produce games for the system, Square created the shell company The Game Designers Studio and released Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles, which spawned its own metaseries within the main franchise.[38] Final Fantasy XI's lack of an online method of subscription cancellation prompted the creation of legislation in Illinois that requires internet gaming services to provide such a method to the state's residents.[204]

The Green Mile and Kappa Monster rolls are my favorites, with honorable mention to the Lemon roll and El Diablo. I do want to mention, in some of their rolls they use real blue crab not the fake Krab meat you find at other places, it has a different look and flavor. My boyfriend found it "too fishy" and thought it was spoiled Krab meat or something but he doesn't have the most refined of palates. Just keep in mind that it'll have a "fishier" flavor in case that's not your thing. I personally loved it.
Investigate was our first Board Game Bento, and it was extremely impressive even before we saw the contents. By chance, I saw the UPS guy coming up to our porch with a bright red armful, and my first thought was “that huge box can’t be it, can it?” Usually, I can just crack the screen door and grab most deliveries with one hand, even most other subscription boxes like Loot Crate. I don’t have enormous hands, but I don’t have Donald Trump sized hands either. Board Game Bento Investigate is a 13″x11″x6.5″ box, so I had to open the screen door most of the way, step out onto the porch, and grab it with both hands, as its smallest side couldn’t possibly be grasped one handed except by this Ukranian strongman.
Board Game Bento, today’s sponsor, has a different theme each month, and they guarantee at least $80 worth of games and accessories in each box. A monthly subscription (with a month-to-month commitment and the ability to cancel anytime) will set you back $50 + s/h. Committing to a six-month subscription reduces that price a bit. So this box is pricier than the comic book version (and many other monthly subscription boxes), which obviously means you’re taking more of a risk.
Biggs and Wedge, inspired by two Star Wars characters of the same name, appear in numerous games as minor characters, sometimes as comic relief.[23][73] The later games in the series feature several males with effeminate characteristics.[80][81] Recurring creatures include Chocobos and Moogles.[23] Chocobos are large, often flightless birds that appear in several installments as a means of long-distance travel for characters. Moogles, on the other hand, are white, stout creatures resembling teddy bears with wings and a single antenna. They serve different capacities in games including mail delivery, weaponsmiths, party members, and saving the game. Chocobo and Moogle appearances are often accompanied by specific musical themes that have been arranged differently for separate games.[3][23][73] Final Fantasy is also well known for its enemy monsters and creatures.[82]
As for the quality of the games, they appear to come from experienced publishers. None of the games included generally have stellar ratings, but we would not call any of the titles “bad” games. They’re not the cream of the gaming crop, but they also don’t appear to be games that would get seriously negative ratings from us. That being said, one month’s game box included Walled City: Londonderry and Borderlands which happens to be one of my favorite games of all time.
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][83] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]

coimbra board game

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