First off, full disclosure, I have been a subscriber of Board Game Bento from the very beginning. I can say I have really enjoyed getting this every month. I have a large collection of games (800+) and BGB manages to include ones I don’t already own every month. I think I average 1 duplicate a month. I like the thrill of not knowing what will be in the box each month. I also like that they put in games that I might not have given a try otherwise. Take Burger Boss by Legend Express. It comes in a square box and a plastic hamburger. Looking at it, you would think it was a game for small children. It is actually a fun worker placement game that can be used to introduce new people to the mechanic. I never would have thought to give that game a try and would have passed it up just by looking at the packaging. As long as I keep getting these types of games, I’ll keep subscribing.
the only one I've ever saw that made sense was an electronics maker-esque kind of deal. if you were getting into messing around with audrinos, raspberry pis, breadboards, etc, it was pretty great. you got a bunch of resistors, leds, jumpers, boards, transistors, capacitors, motors, mini solar panels, etc and a bunch of practical and cool projects to do.
Lastly is the much-honored Spyfall, which currently has a lot of buzz among the board game enthusiasts that subscribed to this box, as it was nominated for two Golden Geek awards, won the 2014 Best Party Game from the Dice Tower Gaming Awards, received a Major Fun! Award, and recently took a honorable mention in the announcement of this year’s Spiel des Jahres nominees.
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
There is no boring food served here!  What a fun place to try gourmet aged meats.  We had a charcuterie platter and their Daily Special Bento Box.  The platter was full of yummy sliced meats, cheeses, bread, mini pickles, dipping sauces/spreads.  The Bento Box was a fun mix of gourmet delights.  The Butchers Wife salad in the Bento Box was delicious.  The brewed ice tea was perfect.  On the other hand, my husband didn't love it and he was still hungry afterwards.  He thought it was too expensive for what we got.  But he was grouchy all day so take that with a grain of salt.  ;-)

I’ve been reluctant to purchase a subscription to Board Game Bento because I already have so many board games at home and I was worried about getting duplicates while spending $60 on a bunch of games I didn’t really want. Don’t get me wrong, I think the idea is a fantastic one but I wasn’t sure if it was right for me, so I followed the Facebook Group for a bit and soon enough I found a theme I could get behind. “The Past”
Where I think Board Game Bento should be headed, if they really want to shine in this industry, is by offering home delivery of the newest  board games released each month. Then you wouldn’t have to do all the research, driving or internet shopping to find what’s hot. They would just be waiting for you in the mailbox each month and I feel like many veteran gamers, like myself, would defiantly pay for that service.
Ben Hsu, Richard Bliss, Uncle Doug MacDonand, Brian Colin, Peter Smyth, Mark Buffington, Josh H., Propelstalz, Mary Crocker, Wayne Moulton Jr, Mitch Gross, Jim Valko, Andrew Brown, Lucy Ravitch, Nicholas Duresky, Heather Hofshi, John Kemp, Thorsten Karge, Natasha Dzurny, Keith Ives, Benjamin Chan, Neal Bhatnagar, Justin Farr, Regan Lee, Elaine, Nate Fugal, Stephanie Tennison, Jon Rasmussen, Ryan Pulis, Owen Duffy, Colman Reilly, Anthony, Mark Richman, Alexis Ohanian, Steve, Greg “TVsEgon” Skinner, Andy Saavedra, Daniel, Willie Raymond Taylor III, Chad Ingham, Irene Christian, Clinton Richmond, Jamey Stegmaier, James Allenspach, John Howell, Leif Terry, Tiago Pereira, Nathan Heath, Grinidon, Roman, Berserker Hew, Clark Stacey, Ben Harkins, Kayvaan Ghassemieh, Travis B., Justin Myers, Magna Nordgard, Jim Griffin, Jeff, David Smith, Matthew Titelbaum, Dennis Hitzeman, Daniel Lieske, Michael Jantze, Ruddy, Tom Damico, Kelson, Michelangelo Grigni

The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][95] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
Three Final Fantasy installments were released on the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Final Fantasy was released in Japan in 1987 and in North America in 1990.[2][3] It introduced many concepts to the console RPG genre, and has since been remade on several platforms.[3] Final Fantasy II, released in 1988 in Japan, has been bundled with Final Fantasy in several re-releases.[3][4][5] The last of the NES installments, Final Fantasy III, was released in Japan in 1990;[6] however, it was not released elsewhere until a Nintendo DS remake in 2006.[5]
Personally, for a Wednesday night it's pretty busy. You're jam packed close to strangers... and for me it... I found myself not enjoying conversing with my boyfriend cause I felt like everyone can here us... like the parties in both sides of us... it doesn't make for a private event at all. I wish the tables were spread out further apart so we could enjoy talking more.
All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

We’ve opened a small share of subscription boxes in this household, and while Board Game Bento is a good value, monetarily speaking, that is a standard feature of subscription boxes and we’ve come to expect it; on the other hand, we have received underwhelming subscription boxes before despite their contents’ cash value, so what usually preoccupies us when we are waiting for them is whether they will pass the “intrinsic value” test—that is, ignoring the contents’ price points, will the box be packed with goodness?   I can tell you that our first Board Game Bento passed this test, as we have already had a wonderful time playing Spyfall, and I am already cogitating strategies for our future play; Salem and Machine of Death look like fun games with unique themes as well, and I have high hopes for them.
As I said, Board Game Bento guarantees at least an $80 value. The four games in this particular box retail for about $100. Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?
Where I think Board Game Bento should be headed, if they really want to shine in this industry, is by offering home delivery of the newest  board games released each month. Then you wouldn’t have to do all the research, driving or internet shopping to find what’s hot. They would just be waiting for you in the mailbox each month and I feel like many veteran gamers, like myself, would defiantly pay for that service.

Basically, what Corndance Tavern has done is section off a bit of the restaurant near the Corndance bar and turned it into a mini-restaurant/butcher shop. They have a little cold case with a selection of maybe 10 different meats that are shooting for an upmarket clientele. We're talking 55-day dry-aged beef, which if you know your steak is super difficult to find anywhere, not just South Bend. Alongside that are some nice pork chops and some house-made sausage.


The Green Mile and Kappa Monster rolls are my favorites, with honorable mention to the Lemon roll and El Diablo. I do want to mention, in some of their rolls they use real blue crab not the fake Krab meat you find at other places, it has a different look and flavor. My boyfriend found it "too fishy" and thought it was spoiled Krab meat or something but he doesn't have the most refined of palates. Just keep in mind that it'll have a "fishier" flavor in case that's not your thing. I personally loved it.
I'm actually happy about Burger Boss since I figure this would actually get played more than FCM in my house. I also just learned about Foodfighters from The Game Boy Geek's review and I was hoping it would be included. I was even more pleased that one of the expansion factions was included as well. I already have Sushi Go, though I have an first edition from Adventureland Games, and the one in the box was the new one from Gamewright.
Artistic design, including character and monster creations, was handled by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano from Final Fantasy through Final Fantasy VI. Amano also handled title logo designs for all of the main series and the image illustrations from Final Fantasy VII onward.[102] Tetsuya Nomura was chosen to replace Amano because Nomura's designs were more adaptable to 3D graphics. He worked with the series from Final Fantasy VII through Final Fantasy X;[74][102] for Final Fantasy IX, however, character designs were handled by Shukō Murase, Toshiyuki Itahana, and Shin Nagasawa.[112] Nomura is also the character designer of the Kingdom Hearts series, Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, and Fabula Nova Crystallis: Final Fantasy.[113] Other designers include Nobuyoshi Mihara and Akihiko Yoshida. Mihara was the character designer for Final Fantasy XI, and Yoshida served as character designer for Final Fantasy Tactics, the Square-produced Vagrant Story, and Final Fantasy XII.[40][114]
Many Final Fantasy games have been included in various lists of top games. Several games have been listed on multiple IGN "Top Games" lists.[159][160][161][162][163][164] Eleven games were listed on Famitsu's 2006 "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time", four of which were in the top ten, with Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy VII coming first and second, respectively.[165] The series holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, which include the "Most Games in an RPG Series" (13 main games, seven enhanced games, and 32 spin-off games), the "Longest Development Period" (the production of Final Fantasy XII took five years), and the "Fastest-Selling Console RPG in a Single Day" (Final Fantasy X).[143][166] The 2009 edition listed two games from the series among the top 50 consoles games: Final Fantasy XII at number 8 and Final Fantasy VII at number 20.[167]

I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.


Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]
Following in the successful footsteps of Agar.io, Slither.io is essentially multiplayer Snake for the 21st century. Players begin as small snakes, and they must eat food (i.e. little blobs on the map) to grow. Larger snakes have an easier time trapping smaller ones and making them disappear. When an enemy snake gets trapped, it will become food for others. The simplicity of Slither.io makes it a great choice for quick, fun multiplayer gaming when bored. Plus, a broad selection of neon-colored skins results in eye-catching, pleasing graphics.
The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]
Investigate, the theme of May’s Board Game Bento, is not unknown to tabletop gamers, whether the classic mansion setting of Clue, or the psychic detectives in the seance simulator, Mysterium, or the more direct dungeon delving and looting of Dungeons & Dragons. In a way, every subscription box promises a mystery, so the Investigate themed Board Game Bento is the most sincere subscription box of them all, admitting to the opener that it is, indeed, a Schrodinger’s Cat of unknown contents—unless, of course, the user has sought spoilers on Google or unboxing videos on YouTube prior to its arrival.  On that note, if you’re a subscriber and you haven’t received your Board Game Bento this month, be aware that spoilers lie below, and proceeding would be like peeking in the Clue envelope.
When we initially arrived and spoke to the hostess, she was very short with us and honestly seemed like she didn't want to be there at all. It was so unpleasant that I honestly considered not dining at Kappa Sushi. I say this not to call her out, but to hopefully send a message to the business to reevaluate training for their front of house staff. They almost lost my business and have possibly lost other business due to this.
only reason I didn't go for it was whenever I start a project, I end up just paying an extra few dollars and buying a large assortment of whatever I need. so while buying 1 or 2 pcs of 5 or 6 different resistors is expensive, buying 2500 of 50 different kinds is relatively cheap in the long run after you do a few projects. I did the same thing with switches, leds, and other components.. so I wont really get anything out a subscription.. nor do I have the time to do a project a month.
What makes a sushi place a 5 star rating for me? Cleanliness, fresh food, good ambience, and good… What makes a sushi place a 5 star rating for me? Cleanliness, fresh food, good ambience, and good service. All of the above were checked at Kappa Sushi. I came here on a Tuesday night and it was pretty busy. But the hostess was friendly and sat us almost immediately.
Overall I'm not really impressed with my box. Yes, I was happy about one of the games but I would have preferred two solid games over one solid and two mediocre games. I don't feel as though I've received a deal since two of the three games are unlikely to be played. I understand that this is the risk you take with mystery boxes but I just don't think Board Game Bento is going to be the right subscription box for me. 

Letterpress is the ultimate two-player word game. It’s a mixture of Scrabble, Boggle, and Risk. Driven by the official Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Letterpress challenges players to find as many words as possible on a 5×5 board. However, simply spelling words isn’t enough to win. There are many additional elements to the gameplay, including tile-stealing and board-coloring. Word sleuths can chat with each other and track their overall progress on Letterpress’s official leaderboards.
I just received my first box. I signed up for the What's Cookin' box because the description said that it includes a game that sold out at Essen 2015. The only food related game that fit that description was Food Chain Magnate. I highly doubted that game would be included, but I figured I'd take a chance just in case it was. Shortly before the boxes were sent out I learned about Burger Boss and in one of the forums the publisher hinted that it would be in an upcoming BGB box. Sure enough it was, along with a Board Game Bento Secret Mission promo card, Foodfighters w/Foodfighters: the Grains Expansion and Sushi Go.
The box then featured a pair of two-player titles. First up is Super Showdown by Touch Paper Press. The game is about the size of a paperback book, making it easy to pack up and take with you, and features graphics similar to the golden age of comics. The board itself is a square as long as a regular playing card. One takes the role of hero and the other villain as you take turns rolling dice and placing cards down to try and outsmart each other either with the highest card value during confrontations, being the only one at the center of Mayhem or trying to bust your opponent’s card total in a battle of wits. The game just takes a few minutes to learn and set up, and only 10 minutes to get an entire game in, meaning it’s great to use to pass a few minutes, or to use while waiting for the latest hero movie to start.
I tried Board Game Bento one month just as a present to myself. Honestly, I could have purchased all the games for cheaper from "that big online store." And there was one game I never would have purchased for myself, ever. It is a theme I just don't care for. The other 2 games I haven't played yet. Honestly I don't know if they are any good. I've never heard of either of them. There were a couple mini surprises in the box (which was nice), but it wasn't overwhelming.
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