Honestly May was my first box as well. I was a bit underwhelmed by the theme, and I figured that a copy of Sushi Go would be included. Honestly though I have to admit that I'm pleased with what I got. My daughter and I play Food Fighters almost nightly. It's right on the cusp of being to simplistic for her (she's turning 8) but it's a great game for introducing your child to the concept of strategy without overwhelming them.
the only one I've ever saw that made sense was an electronics maker-esque kind of deal. if you were getting into messing around with audrinos, raspberry pis, breadboards, etc, it was pretty great. you got a bunch of resistors, leds, jumpers, boards, transistors, capacitors, motors, mini solar panels, etc and a bunch of practical and cool projects to do.

Board Game Bento is a monthly subscription box for board gamers. I've never subscribed before but since there was a 25% off coupon for December and I wanted to treat myself for Christmas, I decided I would try out a one month subscription. The weather has been pretty yucky and the theme of the box was "Fun in the Sun; Not Sports 2" so I figured some summer games would be a good way to start off the new year. The box did end up being delayed due to weather, of course, but arrived late last week. 
MacKenzie Paulus, Megan Fulton, Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro
PBL Robots was also a neat surprise. To anyone that likes to play things like Battletech and such, this game is a winner. Players start with a pilot and construct the robot. This is all done with cards and the goal is to destroy your opponent’s robot. On your turn, players can either build or attack, so you have to manage your priorities in order to succeed. Robots is a keeper, for sure.
Ok, you all know how much I love board games, and you know that I’m a sucker for subscription boxes, right? Well, Board Game Bento combines both of these loves. Each box includes $80+ worth of games, expansions, and accessories, and they arrive in the mail each month. It’s like a regular built-in game night delivered right to your door! And they’ve got something special happening for the May box…
Our main course comes out. Hubby had "The Butcher" burger, with a delightful side of green bean fries. and I had the "Hot Doug", with matchstick fries and a spicy ketchup. Hubby loved his burger. And so did I when I took my obligatory share. ;-) It was perfectly cooked, juicy and didn't fall a part. My Hot Doug was a sort of deconstructed hot dog, comprised of sliced duck sausage, each on its own toasted piece of brioche and sprinkled with hot mustard, gravy and fried foie gras. So good.

Ordered 2 Rainbow Rolls, the order was prompt and ready when we came to pickup (within 10min of placing the order!).  There was a generous amount of fish on top, nice thick slices of hamachi, tuna, ebi, salmon and halibut.  The fish tasted very fresh, rice was well seasoned, the roll fillings were generous and fresh as well ...a quality sushi roll.:)
This one is worth looking for. Exceptional friendly service, nice atmosphere. Our food was excellent - the bourbon burger made with dry-aged beef and pickled jalapenos was a wow. Pastrami is intensely pastrami and excellent. Try the bento box of multiple daily specials to get a good overview of what they offer. Pollo rico slider was a little dry but you could definitely taste the outdoor grilled flavor. The matchstick fries were a big hit at our table. I think a lot of people don't know this place is open yet or how to find it even though it's part of the Corndance building.  It's one of the best burger and casual food places in town and it's local. We'll be back, especially to try all the cool "hot dogs" which look like the now closed Hot Doug's in Chicago.
I should have done a better job paying attention to what he was ordering, but everything we had was good! We started with some sashimi and nigiri items (including lobster tail and uni), then several rolls. My bro's favorite is the spam and eggs. For our 10-month old baby, we ordered her the avocado tempura and gyoza. She was having a great time enjoying her dishes!
Basically, what Corndance Tavern has done is section off a bit of the restaurant near the Corndance bar and turned it into a mini-restaurant/butcher shop. They have a little cold case with a selection of maybe 10 different meats that are shooting for an upmarket clientele. We're talking 55-day dry-aged beef, which if you know your steak is super difficult to find anywhere, not just South Bend. Alongside that are some nice pork chops and some house-made sausage.

If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.
When we initially arrived and spoke to the hostess, she was very short with us and honestly seemed like she didn't want to be there at all. It was so unpleasant that I honestly considered not dining at Kappa Sushi. I say this not to call her out, but to hopefully send a message to the business to reevaluate training for their front of house staff. They almost lost my business and have possibly lost other business due to this.
Writers for Board Game Quest are occasionally asked to evaluate a product that we might not be the main consumers for. In the case of a board game subscription service, receiving a monthly drop of board games is something we’re familiar with as a matter of course. For gamers out there paying for this type of service, you probably want to know what to expect.
Kappa Sushi is located in the busy shopping center containing Trader Joe's and Board n Brew. This sushi restaurant is crowded nearly every evening of the week and the seating is extremely limited (about 50 people max). When checking in to the hostess booth, there is no waiting area. So, if there's a wait and it's cold outside, you have to wait in the cold like a hobo. When you actually do get a seat, the dining room is tiny, but very comfortable. The menu is pretty huge with a lot of different items. In particular, their sushi roll selection is AMAZING! The Surf n Turf Roll, containing Kobe beef and lobster is flavorful and cooked to perfection! The Lemon Roll is very tangy throughout the roll, but very good! The BEST Roll is the Sancho Roll! The jumbo shrimp, blue crab, and seared albacore go perfect with the jalapeño ponzu sauce! The Spicy Garlic Edamame was a miss as the sauce tasted very watered down and bland. The prices of the rolls range from $10-$16, so a little on the pricey side... but the fresh delicious ingredients make it worth it. I'd come back just for the Sancho Roll and order 3 of them! They have an awesome happy hour too! 5 stars overall!

As I said, they guarantee at least an $80 value, and they also promise at least three different games in each box (or two games and an expansion). Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?


Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]
I decided not to sub to Bento because of the fact they just blindly send you something. Subscribed to Game Box Monthly instead since Brian actually tries to find something you don't have. I have a prepaid 6 month sub there. My husband also got me AwesomePack for my birthday. After 6 boxes, I'll cancel if they haven't proven to be good fits for us (especially since I got GBM on sale @ 50% discount).
If you haven’t played #koboldsatemybaby then you’re missing out on some serious #RPG shenanigans! It’s one of my favorite RPGs to introduce new players to as it’s simple to learn, can be played in a night AND opens players to light and creative collaborative thinking 😊 A fun RPG icebreaker. ❤️ @9thlevelgames . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #roleplayinggame #gamenight #rpgaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #rpgsofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #newgamers #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #beginner #d6system #criticalrole #kidsgames #kobolds
MacKenzie Paulus, Megan Fulton, Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro
Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent, many gameplay elements recur throughout the series.[72][73] Most games contain elements of fantasy and science fiction and feature recycled names often inspired from various cultures' history, languages and mythology, including Asian, European, and Middle-Eastern.[74] Examples include weapon names like Excalibur and Masamune—derived from Arthurian legend and the Japanese swordsmith Masamune respectively—as well as the spell names Holy, Meteor, and Ultima.[73][74] Beginning with Final Fantasy IV, the main series adopted its current logo style that features the same typeface and an emblem designed by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano. The emblem relates to a game's plot and typically portrays a character or object in the story. Subsequent remakes of the first three games have replaced the previous logos with ones similar to the rest of the series.[73]
Wormax.io is an eat-or-be-eaten multiplayer game. Strongly inspired by Slither.io, Wormax.io improves upon its predecessor in several big ways. Acceleration, Stop, and Ghost are three unlockable skills that make the gameplay much more dynamic and competitive. At any point during the game, players can slither over a multitude of boosters for extra health, vision, and magnetic abilities. Wormax.io also has excellent replay value, thanks to its unique “Artifact” currency and league system.

^ "Video interview with FINAL FANTASY XII Directors". FINAL FANTASY XII Collector's Edition Bonus DVD. Square Enix Co., Ltd. October 31, 2006. Archived from the original on December 6, 2013. Retrieved April 8, 2011. Hiroshi Minagawa: In the course of development, Jun Akiyama and Daisuke Watanabe came up with many ideas but ultimately we had to abandon many of them. I'd heard their original ideas and I wish we could have included them all. Once we began development and many of the systems were in place, the team had many progressive ideas. It was the most enjoyable part of the project. But as we approached the project's end, I had to point out features we had to drop in order for the game to be finished. Which is unfortunate, since I'm sure people would have enjoyed the game that much more if we could have left all our original ideas in.
Biggs and Wedge, inspired by two Star Wars characters of the same name, appear in numerous games as minor characters, sometimes as comic relief.[23][73] The later games in the series feature several males with effeminate characteristics.[80][81] Recurring creatures include Chocobos and Moogles.[23] Chocobos are large, often flightless birds that appear in several installments as a means of long-distance travel for characters. Moogles, on the other hand, are white, stout creatures resembling teddy bears with wings and a single antenna. They serve different capacities in games including mail delivery, weaponsmiths, party members, and saving the game. Chocobo and Moogle appearances are often accompanied by specific musical themes that have been arranged differently for separate games.[3][23][73] Final Fantasy is also well known for its enemy monsters and creatures.[82]
For the original Final Fantasy, Sakaguchi required a larger production team than Square's previous games. He began crafting the game's story while experimenting with gameplay ideas. Once the gameplay system and game world size were established, Sakaguchi integrated his story ideas into the available resources. A different approach has been taken for subsequent games; the story is completed first and the game built around it.[101] Designers have never been restricted by consistency, though most feel each game should have a minimum number of common elements. The development teams strive to create completely new worlds for each game, and avoid making new games too similar to previous ones. Game locations are conceptualized early in development and design details like building parts are fleshed out as a base for entire structures.[72]
In our shipment, unboxed in the video below, you can see exactly what we saw when opening the box. A decent expectation is three games: one “filler” level game (Rocky Road ala Mode), one medium box (Hotshots), and one more mainstream level game (New York 1901). All of the titles are light to medium in terms of difficulty and still relatively new. The box also included one cooperative game which was nice. Overall, it’s easy to see that the games provided are curated and sometimes also have a theme.
We were too full for dessert, but when the server said "cake in a can" and that we could take it home I said "yes please!" It is exactly as described. A blueberry sour cream cake in a soda can. It's packaged at the same place that their beer is brewed and is pressurized, so make sure to refrigerate until you are ready to eat it and eat it quickly because it is perishable. We ate later that day so it was totally safe and "uuuuuuuuuuu".
However, unless you have a particularly robust collection or are like several GeekDad contributors (who shall remain nameless) and have a Kickstarter obsession, you’re probably safe. The games are generally from smaller, independent publishers and started out on a crowdfunding platform. Which–to me–makes them all the more exciting. These are games that might not land on “hot” lists but still deserve table time.
However, the series has garnered some criticism. IGN has commented that the menu system used by the games is a major detractor for many and is a "significant reason why they haven't touched the series."[23] The site has also heavily criticized the use of random encounters in the series' battle systems.[168][169] IGN further stated the various attempts to bring the series into film and animation have either been unsuccessful, unremarkable, or did not live up to the standards of the games.[11] In 2007, Edge criticized the series for a number of related games that include the phrase "Final Fantasy" in their titles, which are considered inferior to previous games. It also commented that with the departure of Hironobu Sakaguchi, the series might be in danger of growing stale.[46]

In 2005, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, a theatrical CGI film, and Last Order: Final Fantasy VII, a non-canon OVA,[48] were released as part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. Advent Children was animated by Visual Works, which helped the company create CG sequences for the games.[49] The film, unlike The Spirits Within, gained mixed to positive reviews from critics[50][51][52] and has become a commercial success.[53] Last Order, on the other hand, was released in Japan in a special DVD bundle package with Advent Children. Last Order sold out quickly[54] and was positively received by Western critics,[55][56] though fan reaction was mixed over changes to established story scenes.[57]
Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various media. Multiple anime and computer-generated imagery (CGI) films have been produced that are based either on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an original video animation (OVA), Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals, a sequel to Final Fantasy V. The story was set in the same world as the game, although 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes, first in Japan in 1994 and later in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998. In 2001, Square Pictures released its first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The film is set on a future Earth invaded by alien life forms.[45] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb and garnered mixed reviews.[45][46][47]
This month’s accessory is great for both game players an collectors: the Might Meeples Justice League Collection Tin. Honestly, I never knew there were custom Meeple until I saw this. The tin features seven Meeple: Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman The Flash, Green Lantern, Aquaman and Martian Manhunter. These can be used in place of Meeple, in place of regular game tokens or even just to display.  There are also quite a few more you can find via blind bags, but this is a great start for gamers.
The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) also featured three installments of the main series, all of which have been re-released on several platforms. Final Fantasy IV was released in 1991; in North America, it was released as Final Fantasy II.[7][8] It introduced the "Active Time Battle" system.[9] Final Fantasy V, released in 1992 in Japan, was the first game in the series to spawn a sequel: a short anime series, Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals.[3][10][11] Final Fantasy VI was released in Japan in 1994, titled Final Fantasy III in North America.[12]
We’ve opened a small share of subscription boxes in this household, and while Board Game Bento is a good value, monetarily speaking, that is a standard feature of subscription boxes and we’ve come to expect it; on the other hand, we have received underwhelming subscription boxes before despite their contents’ cash value, so what usually preoccupies us when we are waiting for them is whether they will pass the “intrinsic value” test—that is, ignoring the contents’ price points, will the box be packed with goodness?   I can tell you that our first Board Game Bento passed this test, as we have already had a wonderful time playing Spyfall, and I am already cogitating strategies for our future play; Salem and Machine of Death look like fun games with unique themes as well, and I have high hopes for them.
Investigate was our first Board Game Bento, and it was extremely impressive even before we saw the contents. By chance, I saw the UPS guy coming up to our porch with a bright red armful, and my first thought was “that huge box can’t be it, can it?” Usually, I can just crack the screen door and grab most deliveries with one hand, even most other subscription boxes like Loot Crate. I don’t have enormous hands, but I don’t have Donald Trump sized hands either. Board Game Bento Investigate is a 13″x11″x6.5″ box, so I had to open the screen door most of the way, step out onto the porch, and grab it with both hands, as its smallest side couldn’t possibly be grasped one handed except by this Ukranian strongman.
In our shipment, unboxed in the video below, you can see exactly what we saw when opening the box. A decent expectation is three games: one “filler” level game (Rocky Road ala Mode), one medium box (Hotshots), and one more mainstream level game (New York 1901). All of the titles are light to medium in terms of difficulty and still relatively new. The box also included one cooperative game which was nice. Overall, it’s easy to see that the games provided are curated and sometimes also have a theme.
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