BOARD GAME BENTO is a blind box subscription service for tabletop gaming enthusiasts. Every month, for as low as $45/month plus shipping & handling, subscribers receive at least $80 worth of board games and add-ons at their door step. Each box includes either three different games from three different publishers, or two games and an expansion for one of the included games. The add-ons tie into the month's theme and game content, making the experience of playing a game out of a Board Game Bento box different from playing the same game off the shelf.
We played Spyfall in our most recent game night, and you’ll see this week’s Game Night recap as well as a formal review of the game later on Board of Life. Suffice to say that we couldn’t have been more excited to learn this game, which we discovered has a very interesting dual dynamic: if you’re not the spy that round, you have to “find your crew” as fast as possible by tipping them off without tipping off the spy; if you’re the spy, you’re in the dark and must gather your intelligence before the rest of the group realizes who is the odd man (or woman) out.
I tried Board Game Bento one month just as a present to myself. Honestly, I could have purchased all the games for cheaper from "that big online store." And there was one game I never would have purchased for myself, ever. It is a theme I just don't care for. The other 2 games I haven't played yet. Honestly I don't know if they are any good. I've never heard of either of them. There were a couple mini surprises in the box (which was nice), but it wasn't overwhelming.
Rick has locked the family inside their house. Why? Because the family has grown. Parasites masquerading as family and close friends have infiltrated and have inserted pleasant memories into everyone's minds to make them think they're real — and more keep coming! You must figure out which of these new, zany characters are real and which ones are parasites that need to be exterminated. Think you've got what it takes to save the world?
Zombie Tower 3D is the big game item in this month’s box. The game can be played in two ways; semi-cooperatively or fully cooperatively! This game utilizes a unique 3D board that also acts as a screen, separating you from your teammates. In the game you must battle through hordes of zombies, and save survivors all while trying to stay alive. This game is very reminiscent of classic zombie movies and looks to have a very original style of game play.
^ "Video interview with FINAL FANTASY XII Directors". FINAL FANTASY XII Collector's Edition Bonus DVD. Square Enix Co., Ltd. October 31, 2006. Archived from the original on December 6, 2013. Retrieved April 8, 2011. Hiroshi Minagawa: In the course of development, Jun Akiyama and Daisuke Watanabe came up with many ideas but ultimately we had to abandon many of them. I'd heard their original ideas and I wish we could have included them all. Once we began development and many of the systems were in place, the team had many progressive ideas. It was the most enjoyable part of the project. But as we approached the project's end, I had to point out features we had to drop in order for the game to be finished. Which is unfortunate, since I'm sure people would have enjoyed the game that much more if we could have left all our original ideas in.

Ordered 2 Rainbow Rolls, the order was prompt and ready when we came to pickup (within 10min of placing the order!).  There was a generous amount of fish on top, nice thick slices of hamachi, tuna, ebi, salmon and halibut.  The fish tasted very fresh, rice was well seasoned, the roll fillings were generous and fresh as well ...a quality sushi roll.:)
Ben Hsu, Richard Bliss, Uncle Doug MacDonand, Brian Colin, Peter Smyth, Mark Buffington, Josh H., Propelstalz, Mary Crocker, Wayne Moulton Jr, Mitch Gross, Jim Valko, Andrew Brown, Lucy Ravitch, Nicholas Duresky, Heather Hofshi, John Kemp, Thorsten Karge, Natasha Dzurny, Keith Ives, Benjamin Chan, Neal Bhatnagar, Justin Farr, Regan Lee, Elaine, Nate Fugal, Stephanie Tennison, Jon Rasmussen, Ryan Pulis, Owen Duffy, Colman Reilly, Anthony, Mark Richman, Alexis Ohanian, Steve, Greg “TVsEgon” Skinner, Andy Saavedra, Daniel, Willie Raymond Taylor III, Chad Ingham, Irene Christian, Clinton Richmond, Jamey Stegmaier, James Allenspach, John Howell, Leif Terry, Tiago Pereira, Nathan Heath, Grinidon, Roman, Berserker Hew, Clark Stacey, Ben Harkins, Kayvaan Ghassemieh, Travis B., Justin Myers, Magna Nordgard, Jim Griffin, Jeff, David Smith, Matthew Titelbaum, Dennis Hitzeman, Daniel Lieske, Michael Jantze, Ruddy, Tom Damico, Kelson, Michelangelo Grigni
Biggs and Wedge, inspired by two Star Wars characters of the same name, appear in numerous games as minor characters, sometimes as comic relief.[23][73] The later games in the series feature several males with effeminate characteristics.[80][81] Recurring creatures include Chocobos and Moogles.[23] Chocobos are large, often flightless birds that appear in several installments as a means of long-distance travel for characters. Moogles, on the other hand, are white, stout creatures resembling teddy bears with wings and a single antenna. They serve different capacities in games including mail delivery, weaponsmiths, party members, and saving the game. Chocobo and Moogle appearances are often accompanied by specific musical themes that have been arranged differently for separate games.[3][23][73] Final Fantasy is also well known for its enemy monsters and creatures.[82]
The series has inspired numerous game developers. Fable creator Peter Molyneux considers Final Fantasy VII to be the RPG that "defined the genre" for him.[213] BioWare founder Greg Zeschuk cited Final Fantasy VII as "the first really emotionally engaging game" he played and said it had "a big impact" on BioWare's work.[214] The Witcher 3 senior environmental artist Jonas Mattsson cited Final Fantasy as "a huge influence" and said it was "the first RPG" he played through.[215] Mass Effect art director Derek Watts cited Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within as a major influence on the visual design and art direction of the series.[216] BioWare senior product manager David Silverman cited Final Fantasy XII's gambit system as an influence on the gameplay of Dragon Age: Origins.[217] Ubisoft Toronto creative director Maxime Beland cited the original Final Fantasy as a major influence on him.[218] Media Molecule's Constantin Jupp credited Final Fantasy VII with getting him into game design.[219] Tim Schafer also cited Final Fantasy VII as one of his favourite games of all time.[220]
I'd often considered getting this, but the few unboxings I'd seen left me unimpressed. Now that I've seen their entire history? Thank god I never spent my money on them. There's a small handful of games I'd actually want to play, a bunch of games I know I'd play once, say "that was cute" and then never pull off the shelf, and a TON of bottom of the barrel garbage games.
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The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][95] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
It's ok. Very small and lighting is too dim, I'm a fan of natural light and this place has little to none and they have very low lighting. Lunch specials are at a good price but probably not the best thing to order. Their hand rolls and sushi rolls are the real stars of this place. Their sushi bar is small so it will be tough to get a seat there if you go during high peak times.
Tim Bailey, Sara Blackburn, Preston Burt, Stephen Clark, Jeffrey Cohen, Adam Dimuzio, Mathias DeRider, Tom Fassbender, Luke Forney, Logan Giannini, Travis Hanson, Sean Hallenbeck, Michael Harrison, Kim Haynes, Whit Honea, Greg Howley, Michael J., Angela Leach, Michael LeSauvage, Jim MacQuarrie, Eric Parrish, Michael Pistiolas, Ricardo Rebelo, Drew Rich, Mitchell Roush, Mariana Ruiz, Tony Sims, Randy Slavey, Erik Stanfill, Andrew Terranova, Gerry Tolbert, Mark Vorenkamp, Shaun Washington, Chris Wickersham, Sean Z.
Overall I have to say I wasn’t disappointed with what I got. I was lucky enough not to get any duplicate games for my collection and one of the games was on my “to buy” list. I was also happy that these games came from game companies that I already like  to purchase from and were rated pretty well on Board Game Geek, however we have to talk about the “bad stuff” too.

Investigate was our first Board Game Bento, and it was extremely impressive even before we saw the contents. By chance, I saw the UPS guy coming up to our porch with a bright red armful, and my first thought was “that huge box can’t be it, can it?” Usually, I can just crack the screen door and grab most deliveries with one hand, even most other subscription boxes like Loot Crate. I don’t have enormous hands, but I don’t have Donald Trump sized hands either. Board Game Bento Investigate is a 13″x11″x6.5″ box, so I had to open the screen door most of the way, step out onto the porch, and grab it with both hands, as its smallest side couldn’t possibly be grasped one handed except by this Ukranian strongman.
Your buying a present for yourself and it includes the surprise. Them saying a value is them trying to make sure your happy with your present. Its like getting a gift in a secret santa for work or from a distant relative, they want to get you something that you'll like but they don't actually know you well enough to get you something that you'd ask for.
Starting with amazing customer service this place got to five stars before the food even arrived. We got a thorough education on the menu options, beers and operation of the restaurant. We started out with the steak tartar that was served with a raw quail egg still in its shell on top. We dumped the egg over the tar tar, mixed it in and enjoyed it on top of toasted brioche. Imagine I'm saying an inappropriate work right now and prolonging the "uuuuuuuuuu". We also got to sample some aged hot dogs, sliced on toasted brioche with a peanut sauce. Again with the "uuuuuuuuu".
First off, full disclosure, I have been a subscriber of Board Game Bento from the very beginning. I can say I have really enjoyed getting this every month. I have a large collection of games (800+) and BGB manages to include ones I don’t already own every month. I think I average 1 duplicate a month. I like the thrill of not knowing what will be in the box each month. I also like that they put in games that I might not have given a try otherwise. Take Burger Boss by Legend Express. It comes in a square box and a plastic hamburger. Looking at it, you would think it was a game for small children. It is actually a fun worker placement game that can be used to introduce new people to the mechanic. I never would have thought to give that game a try and would have passed it up just by looking at the packaging. As long as I keep getting these types of games, I’ll keep subscribing.
Letterpress is the ultimate two-player word game. It’s a mixture of Scrabble, Boggle, and Risk. Driven by the official Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Letterpress challenges players to find as many words as possible on a 5×5 board. However, simply spelling words isn’t enough to win. There are many additional elements to the gameplay, including tile-stealing and board-coloring. Word sleuths can chat with each other and track their overall progress on Letterpress’s official leaderboards.

Wormax.io is an eat-or-be-eaten multiplayer game. Strongly inspired by Slither.io, Wormax.io improves upon its predecessor in several big ways. Acceleration, Stop, and Ghost are three unlockable skills that make the gameplay much more dynamic and competitive. At any point during the game, players can slither over a multitude of boosters for extra health, vision, and magnetic abilities. Wormax.io also has excellent replay value, thanks to its unique “Artifact” currency and league system.

If you’re not a subscriber currently, you might be asking just what is Board Game Bento?  Or, you don’t know what a subscription box is, which would probably mean that you’re not on social media or you’re muting or unfollowing everyone under the age of 35. Subscription boxes are all the rage nowadays; what’s better than a box full of goodies that you get each month, filled with different desirable items?

As I said, Board Game Bento guarantees at least an $80 value. The four games in this particular box retail for about $100. Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?

Board Game Bento is a monthly subscription box for board gamers. I've never subscribed before but since there was a 25% off coupon for December and I wanted to treat myself for Christmas, I decided I would try out a one month subscription. The weather has been pretty yucky and the theme of the box was "Fun in the Sun; Not Sports 2" so I figured some summer games would be a good way to start off the new year. The box did end up being delayed due to weather, of course, but arrived late last week. 


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The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout.  Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo.  You get what you pay for!  (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)
The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][95] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
Writers for Board Game Quest are occasionally asked to evaluate a product that we might not be the main consumers for. In the case of a board game subscription service, receiving a monthly drop of board games is something we’re familiar with as a matter of course. For gamers out there paying for this type of service, you probably want to know what to expect.
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