Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]
Nancy Drew heads for Japan where she’s staying at a traditional ryokan (inn) for a little RnR with Bess and George, but when reports of a vengeful ghost start scaring away the guests, Nancy’s vacation takes a turn for terror! It’ll be up to you, as Nancy Drew, to uncover the secret that lies beneath the surface, before the ghost can take its revenge in Nancy Drew: Shadow at the Water’s Edge!
Chris Spires, Doug Smidebush, Lior Keinan , Kelvin Nduka, Thad Standley, Nolan Zak, Adam Franks, Stephen Brown, Loren Roberts, Matt and Nykki Boersma, Tom Morgan, Jack Everitt, John Kovalic, Seiler Hagan, Jess Hart, Will James, Christopher M. Kelly, Roberto L. Vargas, Michele Hall, Chuck Lawton, Ismael Schonhorst, (There are those who call him) Tim, Vladimir Weinstein, Randiman Rogers, Robert Booth, Henry Roenke, Kevin Culp, W. David MacKenzie, Nicholas Richards, John Idlor, Michael Fox, Rob H., Matthew Cody, Dan Callahan, Patrick Kohn, Seth Phillips, Kevin Korpi, Ben MS, Monica, Mark Gonyea, Pharlain Ross, Derick Larson, Furstarter.com
Investigate was our first Board Game Bento, and it was extremely impressive even before we saw the contents. By chance, I saw the UPS guy coming up to our porch with a bright red armful, and my first thought was “that huge box can’t be it, can it?” Usually, I can just crack the screen door and grab most deliveries with one hand, even most other subscription boxes like Loot Crate. I don’t have enormous hands, but I don’t have Donald Trump sized hands either. Board Game Bento Investigate is a 13″x11″x6.5″ box, so I had to open the screen door most of the way, step out onto the porch, and grab it with both hands, as its smallest side couldn’t possibly be grasped one handed except by this Ukranian strongman.

The series' popularity has resulted in its appearance and reference in numerous facets of popular culture like anime, TV series, and webcomics.[205][206][207] Music from the series has permeated into different areas of culture. Final Fantasy IV's "Theme of Love" was integrated into the curriculum of Japanese school children and has been performed live by orchestras and metal bands.[208] In 2003, Uematsu co-founded The Black Mages, a instrumental rock group independent of Square that has released albums of arranged Final Fantasy tunes.[209][210] Bronze medalists Alison Bartosik and Anna Kozlova performed their synchronized swimming routine at the 2004 Summer Olympics to music from Final Fantasy VIII.[143] Many of the soundtracks have also been released for sale. Numerous companion books, which normally provide in-depth game information, have been published. In Japan, they are published by Square and are called Ultimania books.[211][212]
Not only is the box an impressive beast, it has colorful box art, in which Monopoly, Catan, and D&D are homaged in cartoons. Inside the box are three games, two of which were popular crowdfunding projects, and the other is a game with a lot of positive word of mouth buzz and several laurel wreaths, the most recent of which is an honorable mention for the 2016 Spiel des Jahres awards. Additionally, there were two expansion sets for one of the games, and a Board Game Bento mouse pad.
the only one I've ever saw that made sense was an electronics maker-esque kind of deal. if you were getting into messing around with audrinos, raspberry pis, breadboards, etc, it was pretty great. you got a bunch of resistors, leds, jumpers, boards, transistors, capacitors, motors, mini solar panels, etc and a bunch of practical and cool projects to do.
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][83] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]

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