I originally wasn't going to subscribe for this one as the theme didn't really interest me, but a discount offer, the mention that this box would have over $100 worth of games, and the hint that one of the games was a Spiel des Jahres nominee got me to give in. Based on the month's theme, I thought the SdJ nominee would've been Codenames or less likely, T.I.M.E. Stories. Alas, the "nominee" was Spyfall. Overall, I'm not very excited about this box as I don't play these types of games, though Salem looks interesting.

hail hydra board game


Ok, you all know how much I love board games, and you know that I’m a sucker for subscription boxes, right? Well, Board Game Bento combines both of these loves. Each box includes $80+ worth of games, expansions, and accessories, and they arrive in the mail each month. It’s like a regular built-in game night delivered right to your door! And they’ve got something special happening for the May box…

Ben Hsu, Richard Bliss, Uncle Doug MacDonand, Brian Colin, Peter Smyth, Mark Buffington, Josh H., Propelstalz, Mary Crocker, Wayne Moulton Jr, Mitch Gross, Jim Valko, Andrew Brown, Lucy Ravitch, Nicholas Duresky, Heather Hofshi, John Kemp, Thorsten Karge, Natasha Dzurny, Keith Ives, Benjamin Chan, Neal Bhatnagar, Justin Farr, Regan Lee, Elaine, Nate Fugal, Stephanie Tennison, Jon Rasmussen, Ryan Pulis, Owen Duffy, Colman Reilly, Anthony, Mark Richman, Alexis Ohanian, Steve, Greg “TVsEgon” Skinner, Andy Saavedra, Daniel, Willie Raymond Taylor III, Chad Ingham, Irene Christian, Clinton Richmond, Jamey Stegmaier, James Allenspach, John Howell, Leif Terry, Tiago Pereira, Nathan Heath, Grinidon, Roman, Berserker Hew, Clark Stacey, Ben Harkins, Kayvaan Ghassemieh, Travis B., Justin Myers, Magna Nordgard, Jim Griffin, Jeff, David Smith, Matthew Titelbaum, Dennis Hitzeman, Daniel Lieske, Michael Jantze, Ruddy, Tom Damico, Kelson, Michelangelo Grigni

Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][83] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]
When your dice won’t crit and you have to learn witchcraft to take matters into your own hands. #diceaddict with @polyherodice . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #boardgame #gamenight #boardgameaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #boardgamesofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #brettspiele #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #rpg #dice #criticalrole #witchcraft #roleplayinggames #dnd #dungeonsanddragons #dicelover #diced #fantasy
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
World’s Fair 1983 by Renegade/Foxtrot Games: When When I opened the box I was very excited to see this game. It was their advertised Mensa Select Game and  it’s made by a publisher I love (they make Lanterns and Lotus). On top of that it scored extra points in my book because it was on my “want list” but not yet in my collection. Whomever picked this game out for the Bento Box certainly deserves a crisp high five as it is a gem.

Best vegetarian sushi I have had ever...hands down!! What I love about this place is that we can customize the rolls. Usually tell them how many rolls we want, what veggies we don't want and if we want tempura style or with mayo etc. The rolls come out, always looking different and we have no idea what veggie combo is in them but they are always delicious!!

The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]

^ "Video interview with FINAL FANTASY XII Directors". FINAL FANTASY XII Collector's Edition Bonus DVD. Square Enix Co., Ltd. October 31, 2006. Archived from the original on December 6, 2013. Retrieved April 8, 2011. Hiroshi Minagawa: In the course of development, Jun Akiyama and Daisuke Watanabe came up with many ideas but ultimately we had to abandon many of them. I'd heard their original ideas and I wish we could have included them all. Once we began development and many of the systems were in place, the team had many progressive ideas. It was the most enjoyable part of the project. But as we approached the project's end, I had to point out features we had to drop in order for the game to be finished. Which is unfortunate, since I'm sure people would have enjoyed the game that much more if we could have left all our original ideas in.

Lastly is the much-honored Spyfall, which currently has a lot of buzz among the board game enthusiasts that subscribed to this box, as it was nominated for two Golden Geek awards, won the 2014 Best Party Game from the Dice Tower Gaming Awards, received a Major Fun! Award, and recently took a honorable mention in the announcement of this year’s Spiel des Jahres nominees.
Investigate, the theme of May’s Board Game Bento, is not unknown to tabletop gamers, whether the classic mansion setting of Clue, or the psychic detectives in the seance simulator, Mysterium, or the more direct dungeon delving and looting of Dungeons & Dragons. In a way, every subscription box promises a mystery, so the Investigate themed Board Game Bento is the most sincere subscription box of them all, admitting to the opener that it is, indeed, a Schrodinger’s Cat of unknown contents—unless, of course, the user has sought spoilers on Google or unboxing videos on YouTube prior to its arrival.  On that note, if you’re a subscriber and you haven’t received your Board Game Bento this month, be aware that spoilers lie below, and proceeding would be like peeking in the Clue envelope.
Chris Spires, Doug Smidebush, Lior Keinan , Kelvin Nduka, Thad Standley, Nolan Zak, Adam Franks, Stephen Brown, Loren Roberts, Matt and Nykki Boersma, Tom Morgan, Jack Everitt, John Kovalic, Seiler Hagan, Jess Hart, Will James, Christopher M. Kelly, Roberto L. Vargas, Michele Hall, Chuck Lawton, Ismael Schonhorst, (There are those who call him) Tim, Vladimir Weinstein, Randiman Rogers, Robert Booth, Henry Roenke, Kevin Culp, W. David MacKenzie, Nicholas Richards, John Idlor, Michael Fox, Rob H., Matthew Cody, Dan Callahan, Patrick Kohn, Seth Phillips, Kevin Korpi, Ben MS, Monica, Mark Gonyea, Pharlain Ross, Derick Larson, Furstarter.com
Following in the successful footsteps of Agar.io, Slither.io is essentially multiplayer Snake for the 21st century. Players begin as small snakes, and they must eat food (i.e. little blobs on the map) to grow. Larger snakes have an easier time trapping smaller ones and making them disappear. When an enemy snake gets trapped, it will become food for others. The simplicity of Slither.io makes it a great choice for quick, fun multiplayer gaming when bored. Plus, a broad selection of neon-colored skins results in eye-catching, pleasing graphics.
Starting with Final Fantasy VIII, the series adopted a more photo-realistic look.[122][123] Like Final Fantasy VII, full motion video (FMV) sequences would have video playing in the background, with the polygonal characters composited on top. Final Fantasy IX returned to the more stylized design of earlier games in the series, although it still maintained, and in many cases slightly upgraded, most of the graphical techniques used in the previous two games.[123] Final Fantasy X was released on the PlayStation 2, and used the more powerful hardware to render graphics in real-time instead of using pre-rendered material to obtain a more dynamic look; the game features full 3D environments, rather than have 3D character models move about pre-rendered backgrounds. It is also the first Final Fantasy game to introduce voice acting, occurring throughout the majority of the game, even with many minor characters.[19] This aspect added a whole new dimension of depth to the character's reactions, emotions, and development.[19][124]
Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various media. Multiple anime and computer-generated imagery (CGI) films have been produced that are based either on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an original video animation (OVA), Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals, a sequel to Final Fantasy V. The story was set in the same world as the game, although 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes, first in Japan in 1994 and later in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998. In 2001, Square Pictures released its first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The film is set on a future Earth invaded by alien life forms.[45] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb and garnered mixed reviews.[45][46][47]
And lastly is Eminent Domain from Tasty Minstrel Games. This is a deck-building game where players fight to control the most planets. You can approach your success through fighting or cultivation and it has a great flow to gameplay that offers plenty of options in how you respond to what your opponents are doing on their turns. Another keeper that appealed to everyone.
In 2009, Final Fantasy XIII was released in Japan, and in North America and Europe the following year, for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[25][26] It is the flagship installment of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy series[27] and became the first mainline game to spawn two direct sequels (XIII-2 and Lightning Returns).[28] It was also the first game released in Chinese & High Definition along with being released on two consoles at once. Final Fantasy XIV, a MMORPG, was released worldwide on Microsoft Windows in 2010, but it received heavy criticism when it was launched, prompting Square Enix to rerelease the game as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, this time to the PlayStation 3 as well, in 2013.[29] Final Fantasy XV is an action role-playing game that was released for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in 2016.[30][31] Originally a XIII spin-off titled Versus XIII, XV uses the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis series, although in many other respects the game stands on its own and has since been distanced from the series by its developers.[32][33][34][35][36][37]
Second is value.  Even if you went with Amazon prices instead of retail this is still a very good price for what you get. The games included this month are rated on board game geek ranging from 6.5-7.3 which is above average and way above what they could have put in the box, especially in a pop culture box. When you sign up  there is a one month plan for $50 or a 6 month plan for $45 a month. If you enjoy things such as loot crate or many of the other boxes that are out there or if you like to be surprised with games every month (i know i would like games to show up every month at my house) than this is for you.
The box then featured a pair of two-player titles. First up is Super Showdown by Touch Paper Press. The game is about the size of a paperback book, making it easy to pack up and take with you, and features graphics similar to the golden age of comics. The board itself is a square as long as a regular playing card. One takes the role of hero and the other villain as you take turns rolling dice and placing cards down to try and outsmart each other either with the highest card value during confrontations, being the only one at the center of Mayhem or trying to bust your opponent’s card total in a battle of wits. The game just takes a few minutes to learn and set up, and only 10 minutes to get an entire game in, meaning it’s great to use to pass a few minutes, or to use while waiting for the latest hero movie to start.
One day later:  The restaurant has gotten back with me and says that Bourbon & Butcher are open for lunch till 5 PM, and then the Corndance is open from 5PM on.  So, I guess that our gift certificate is no good for the Corndance, since the two are not the same, even though they are in the same building.  This is getting so confusing.  We do not normally go out for lunch, but guess that we need to have lunch there just to see what it's like.  They also say that the B & B name is on the Corndance sign, but neither one of us could see it and we were right outside.  They want me to change my review, and I wish that I could, but since I haven't actually eaten there yet, how can I upgrade my rating?  We'll get in there soon and then I'll take care of it.  I hope that we can find it this time.  It shouldn't be that hard to find, since they are both in the same building.  Wish I had known that yesterday.
This product is supplied by Ultra Tokyo Connection for orders within the US and in some cases Canada. Supplies from Ultra Tokyo Connection will not have the Japanese licensor sticker as it is part of the manufacturer's North American supply only and not for sale within Japan, but will include proof of distribution by Ultra Tokyo Connection, a subsidiary of Good Smile Company, on the box.

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