We came in around 9pm on a Saturday night and sat at the sushi bar. The sushi chef's and waiters were friendly. Husband had the calamari, as he is not much of a sushi fan. It was ok...too greasy and was too chewy. Sauce was good though. I had the miso scallop sushi and green mile roll. Both were great and I would get them again. Everything else I saw the chef make looked delicious. A lot of the rolls are tempura shrimp based, while I would have liked to see more of a raw selection.
Service problems galore on my most recent visits.  Last week they seemed to be without a bartender for most of the lunch hour.  10 minutes after I made my drink order, and having seen no bartender, I asked when my drink would be available. I was told the bartender would be there in another 10 minutes. It was another half an hour.  By the time I got my drink it had taken 45 minutes.  The manager made the drink complementary, but someone still left it on my bill and I had to ask for it to be removed.  Then, on my visit today, it took around 25 minutes for our food to come out.  We were informed the kitchen was backed up.  They weren't all that busy so this was odd.  And, once again, I had problems with my drink order.  I ordered a cocktail and they gave me the wrong liquor in it.  Then, there was a mad rush to find the correct liquor (mezcal).  After 10 mins or so I asked them to give up and said I would just order something else. However, when I said this the Mezcal Search Party disbanded and no one asked what else I would like to drink. It took another 10 minutes for the waitress to ask.  After I had informed the Mezcal Search Party to give up, someone had the common sense to say "take it off his bill", but the other person in the search party got all agitated at this and snapped that I was "not her table" leaving me to wonder if this would be taken care of (fortunately, it was).  I really don't appreciate employees getting all angry over basic stuff like this (or, if they do, they should do it away from customers).  Bourbon and Butcher seem incapable of providing timely, professional service.

One of my favorite sushi restaurants. My bf and I ordered the creamy mermaids and chicken karaage to… One of my favorite sushi restaurants. My bf and I ordered the creamy mermaids and chicken karaage to start. The creamy mermaids are rolled up fried wontons with cream cheese and shrimp. It comes with sweet n sour dipping sauce. Soo yummy. Definitely need to order. The chicken karaage is the Japanese version of fried chicken. So good. Next we ordered 2 rolls. The surf and turf roll and the roll of the day which was a Hawaiian roll (I don't remember the name of it but remember it had Hawaiian in the name). The roll of the day was sooo good. Very refreshing and yummy. The surf and turf was good too but we both liked the roll of the day more. Afterwards we ordered one more roll (sorry forgot the name of this one too but it had tempura shrimp in it). Service and servers we patience and friendly. Read more

As I said, Board Game Bento guarantees at least an $80 value. The four games in this particular box retail for about $100. Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?


Following in the successful footsteps of Agar.io, Slither.io is essentially multiplayer Snake for the 21st century. Players begin as small snakes, and they must eat food (i.e. little blobs on the map) to grow. Larger snakes have an easier time trapping smaller ones and making them disappear. When an enemy snake gets trapped, it will become food for others. The simplicity of Slither.io makes it a great choice for quick, fun multiplayer gaming when bored. Plus, a broad selection of neon-colored skins results in eye-catching, pleasing graphics.

The Final Fantasy series and several specific games within it have been credited for introducing and popularizing many concepts that are today widely used in console RPGs.[3][117] The original game is often cited as one of the most influential early console RPGs, and played a major role in legitimizing and popularizing the genre. Many console RPGs featured one-on-one battles against monsters from a first-person perspective. Final Fantasy introduced a side view perspective with groups of monsters against a group of characters that has been frequently used.[3][95][117] It also introduced an early evolving class change system,[195][196] as well as different methods of transportation, including a ship, canoe, and flying airship.[197] Final Fantasy II was the first sequel in the industry to omit characters and locations from the previous game.[5] It also introduced an activity-based progression system,[198] which has been used in later RPG series such as SaGa,[199] Grandia,[200] and The Elder Scrolls.[198] Final Fantasy III introduced the job system, a character progression engine allowing the player to change character classes, as well as acquire new and advanced classes and combine class abilities, at any time during the game.[201] Final Fantasy IV is considered a milestone for the genre, introducing a dramatic storyline with a strong emphasis on character development and personal relationships.[202] Final Fantasy VII is credited as having the largest industry impact of the series,[118] and with allowing console role-playing games to gain mass-market appeal.[203]

Nancy Drew heads for Japan where she’s staying at a traditional ryokan (inn) for a little RnR with Bess and George, but when reports of a vengeful ghost start scaring away the guests, Nancy’s vacation takes a turn for terror! It’ll be up to you, as Nancy Drew, to uncover the secret that lies beneath the surface, before the ghost can take its revenge in Nancy Drew: Shadow at the Water’s Edge!

In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[93][94][95] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[94][96] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[97]

Investigate, the theme of May’s Board Game Bento, is not unknown to tabletop gamers, whether the classic mansion setting of Clue, or the psychic detectives in the seance simulator, Mysterium, or the more direct dungeon delving and looting of Dungeons & Dragons. In a way, every subscription box promises a mystery, so the Investigate themed Board Game Bento is the most sincere subscription box of them all, admitting to the opener that it is, indeed, a Schrodinger’s Cat of unknown contents—unless, of course, the user has sought spoilers on Google or unboxing videos on YouTube prior to its arrival.  On that note, if you’re a subscriber and you haven’t received your Board Game Bento this month, be aware that spoilers lie below, and proceeding would be like peeking in the Clue envelope.
And lastly is Eminent Domain from Tasty Minstrel Games. This is a deck-building game where players fight to control the most planets. You can approach your success through fighting or cultivation and it has a great flow to gameplay that offers plenty of options in how you respond to what your opponents are doing on their turns. Another keeper that appealed to everyone.

My boyfriend and I stopped here on Black Friday. Traffic was crazy so we arrived at 2:30PM (they close at 3PM). We mentally prepared for a justifiably annoyed wait staff. Instead, everyone was kind, welcoming, and never made us feel rushed. I orders the mac and cheese and the green bean fries; he ordered the hot dog and shoestring fries. The mac and cheese was amazing. the sauce they use was so good that my boyfriend couldn't stop dipping his fries in it. The green bean fries tasted very fresh and had just the right amount of breading. Before we left, we had to grab a cake in a can to go. Online, we thought it was a beer. it's not - it's a literal cake in a can. My boyfriend isn't big into sweets and even he loved it. We highly recommend this place.

I tried Board Game Bento one month just as a present to myself. Honestly, I could have purchased all the games for cheaper from "that big online store." And there was one game I never would have purchased for myself, ever. It is a theme I just don't care for. The other 2 games I haven't played yet. Honestly I don't know if they are any good. I've never heard of either of them. There were a couple mini surprises in the box (which was nice), but it wasn't overwhelming.
Free-to-play web games are a worldwide phenomenon. Accessible to anyone with an internet connection, online games entertain while bringing people together. Many of these fascinating, addictive titles let players communicate in-game via text or audio chat. A new era of gaming is here. In addition to passing time and relieving stress, certain online games have been linked to enhanced brain development. Here are five of the best online games to play when you are bored:
This can make sense from a business point of view, but it is unfortunate in any event.  I am guessing part of the problem was getting the news of the product to its target audience.  Local gaming shops, for the most part, aren’t going to recommend essentially buying games from someone else, even if it is cheaper.  Gamers like myself with a large library (not to mention having to pay overseas shipping) are worried about spending big money on games we already have – it’s a bit of a hit and miss scenario.

house of danger board game

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