Several games within the series have become best-selling games. At the end of 2007, the seventh, eighth, and ninth best-selling RPGs were Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, and Final Fantasy X respectively.[143] Final Fantasy VII has sold more than 11 million copies worldwide,[144] earning it the position of the best-selling Final Fantasy game.[145] Within two days of Final Fantasy VIII's North American release on September 9, 1999, it became the top-selling video game in the United States, a position it held for more than three weeks.[146] Final Fantasy X sold over 1.4 million Japanese units in pre-orders alone, which set a record for the fastest-selling console RPG.[143][147] The MMORPG, Final Fantasy XI, reached over 200,000 active daily players in March 2006[148] and had reached over half a million subscribers by July 2007.[46] Final Fantasy XII sold more than 1.7 million copies in its first week in Japan.[149] By November 6, 2006—one week after its release—Final Fantasy XII had shipped approximately 1.5 million copies in North America.[150] Final Fantasy XIII became the fastest-selling game in the franchise,[151] and sold one million units on its first day of sale in Japan.[152] Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, in comparison to its predecessor, was a runaway success, originally suffering from servers being overcrowded,[153] and eventually gaining over one million unique subscribers within two months of its launch.[154]


This can make sense from a business point of view, but it is unfortunate in any event.  I am guessing part of the problem was getting the news of the product to its target audience.  Local gaming shops, for the most part, aren’t going to recommend essentially buying games from someone else, even if it is cheaper.  Gamers like myself with a large library (not to mention having to pay overseas shipping) are worried about spending big money on games we already have – it’s a bit of a hit and miss scenario.

house of danger board game


One day later:  The restaurant has gotten back with me and says that Bourbon & Butcher are open for lunch till 5 PM, and then the Corndance is open from 5PM on.  So, I guess that our gift certificate is no good for the Corndance, since the two are not the same, even though they are in the same building.  This is getting so confusing.  We do not normally go out for lunch, but guess that we need to have lunch there just to see what it's like.  They also say that the B & B name is on the Corndance sign, but neither one of us could see it and we were right outside.  They want me to change my review, and I wish that I could, but since I haven't actually eaten there yet, how can I upgrade my rating?  We'll get in there soon and then I'll take care of it.  I hope that we can find it this time.  It shouldn't be that hard to find, since they are both in the same building.  Wish I had known that yesterday.


I had the charcuterie board and every single thing on it was delicious. My favorite bites were the pork comfit, the terrine and last but not least was a small bite of Lardo. Lardo is a cured slice of fat from prosciutto. I first had this on a trip to Florence, Italy and its only available there for a short time in the spring. It is wonderful spread on a piece of toasted bread.
In 2005, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, a theatrical CGI film, and Last Order: Final Fantasy VII, a non-canon OVA,[48] were released as part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. Advent Children was animated by Visual Works, which helped the company create CG sequences for the games.[49] The film, unlike The Spirits Within, gained mixed to positive reviews from critics[50][51][52] and has become a commercial success.[53] Last Order, on the other hand, was released in Japan in a special DVD bundle package with Advent Children. Last Order sold out quickly[54] and was positively received by Western critics,[55][56] though fan reaction was mixed over changes to established story scenes.[57]
The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) also featured three installments of the main series, all of which have been re-released on several platforms. Final Fantasy IV was released in 1991; in North America, it was released as Final Fantasy II.[7][8] It introduced the "Active Time Battle" system.[9] Final Fantasy V, released in 1992 in Japan, was the first game in the series to spawn a sequel: a short anime series, Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals.[3][10][11] Final Fantasy VI was released in Japan in 1994, titled Final Fantasy III in North America.[12]
Ben Hsu, Richard Bliss, Uncle Doug MacDonand, Brian Colin, Peter Smyth, Mark Buffington, Josh H., Propelstalz, Mary Crocker, Wayne Moulton Jr, Mitch Gross, Jim Valko, Andrew Brown, Lucy Ravitch, Nicholas Duresky, Heather Hofshi, John Kemp, Thorsten Karge, Natasha Dzurny, Keith Ives, Benjamin Chan, Neal Bhatnagar, Justin Farr, Regan Lee, Elaine, Nate Fugal, Stephanie Tennison, Jon Rasmussen, Ryan Pulis, Owen Duffy, Colman Reilly, Anthony, Mark Richman, Alexis Ohanian, Steve, Greg “TVsEgon” Skinner, Andy Saavedra, Daniel, Willie Raymond Taylor III, Chad Ingham, Irene Christian, Clinton Richmond, Jamey Stegmaier, James Allenspach, John Howell, Leif Terry, Tiago Pereira, Nathan Heath, Grinidon, Roman, Berserker Hew, Clark Stacey, Ben Harkins, Kayvaan Ghassemieh, Travis B., Justin Myers, Magna Nordgard, Jim Griffin, Jeff, David Smith, Matthew Titelbaum, Dennis Hitzeman, Daniel Lieske, Michael Jantze, Ruddy, Tom Damico, Kelson, Michelangelo Grigni
Overall I'm not really impressed with my box. Yes, I was happy about one of the games but I would have preferred two solid games over one solid and two mediocre games. I don't feel as though I've received a deal since two of the three games are unlikely to be played. I understand that this is the risk you take with mystery boxes but I just don't think Board Game Bento is going to be the right subscription box for me. 
In 2009, Final Fantasy XIII was released in Japan, and in North America and Europe the following year, for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[25][26] It is the flagship installment of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy series[27] and became the first mainline game to spawn two direct sequels (XIII-2 and Lightning Returns).[28] It was also the first game released in Chinese & High Definition along with being released on two consoles at once. Final Fantasy XIV, a MMORPG, was released worldwide on Microsoft Windows in 2010, but it received heavy criticism when it was launched, prompting Square Enix to rerelease the game as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, this time to the PlayStation 3 as well, in 2013.[29] Final Fantasy XV is an action role-playing game that was released for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in 2016.[30][31] Originally a XIII spin-off titled Versus XIII, XV uses the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis series, although in many other respects the game stands on its own and has since been distanced from the series by its developers.[32][33][34][35][36][37]
We had amazing service! We got to ask lots of questions and even had some sampling's as well. They were very understanding of the gluten intolerant person of our group. We had a wonderful experience and some AMAZING food. We had the Butcher's Bento Box for lunch, the Mac n' Cheese Dog as well as the Fried Chicken. We also had a side of the Green Bean fries and the Can of Cake. All wonderful! I would recommend this place for lunch whole heartedly !

Three Final Fantasy installments were released on the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Final Fantasy was released in Japan in 1987 and in North America in 1990.[2][3] It introduced many concepts to the console RPG genre, and has since been remade on several platforms.[3] Final Fantasy II, released in 1988 in Japan, has been bundled with Final Fantasy in several re-releases.[3][4][5] The last of the NES installments, Final Fantasy III, was released in Japan in 1990;[6] however, it was not released elsewhere until a Nintendo DS remake in 2006.[5]
For the original Final Fantasy, Sakaguchi required a larger production team than Square's previous games. He began crafting the game's story while experimenting with gameplay ideas. Once the gameplay system and game world size were established, Sakaguchi integrated his story ideas into the available resources. A different approach has been taken for subsequent games; the story is completed first and the game built around it.[101] Designers have never been restricted by consistency, though most feel each game should have a minimum number of common elements. The development teams strive to create completely new worlds for each game, and avoid making new games too similar to previous ones. Game locations are conceptualized early in development and design details like building parts are fleshed out as a base for entire structures.[72]

The first five games were directed by Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concepts.[74][102] He drew inspiration for game elements from anime films by Hayao Miyazaki; series staples like the airships and chocobos are inspired by elements in Castle in the Sky and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, respectively.[103] Sakaguchi served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[74][102] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[104][105][106] and has been followed by a new director for each new game. Hiroyuki Ito designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's "Job System", Final Fantasy VIII's "Junction System" and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX.[74][104] In designing the Active Time Battle system, Ito drew inspiration from Formula One racing; he thought it would be interesting if character types had different speeds after watching race cars pass each other.[107] Ito also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[74][104] Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first three games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He also worked as the scenario writer for the spin-off series, Kingdom Hearts.[108] Daisuke Watanabe co-wrote the scenarios for Final Fantasy X and XII, and was the main writer for the XIII games.[109][110][111]
Several individual Final Fantasy games have garnered extra attention; some for their positive reception and others for their negative reception. Final Fantasy VII topped GamePro's "26 Best RPGs of All Time" list,[170] as well as GameFAQs "Best Game Ever" audience polls in 2004 and 2005.[171][172] Despite the success of Final Fantasy VII, it is sometimes criticized as being overrated. In 2003, GameSpy listed it as the seventh most overrated game of all time, while IGN presented views from both sides.[173][174] Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII shipped 392,000 units in its first week of release, but received review scores that were much lower than that of other Final Fantasy games.[175][176][177] A delayed, negative review after the Japanese release of Dirge of Cerberus from Japanese gaming magazine Famitsu hinted at a controversy between the magazine and Square Enix.[178] Though Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within was praised for its visuals, the plot was criticized and the film was considered a box office bomb.[45][46][47][179] Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles for the GameCube received overall positive review scores, but reviews stated that the use of Game Boy Advances as controllers was a big detractor.[117][180] The predominantly negative reception of the original version of Final Fantasy XIV caused then-president Yoichi Wada to issue an official apology during a Tokyo press conference, stating that the brand had been "greatly damaged" by the game's reception.[181]
Board Game Bento is a monthly subscription box for board gamers. I've never subscribed before but since there was a 25% off coupon for December and I wanted to treat myself for Christmas, I decided I would try out a one month subscription. The weather has been pretty yucky and the theme of the box was "Fun in the Sun; Not Sports 2" so I figured some summer games would be a good way to start off the new year. The box did end up being delayed due to weather, of course, but arrived late last week. 
In 2009, Final Fantasy XIII was released in Japan, and in North America and Europe the following year, for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[25][26] It is the flagship installment of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy series[27] and became the first mainline game to spawn two direct sequels (XIII-2 and Lightning Returns).[28] It was also the first game released in Chinese & High Definition along with being released on two consoles at once. Final Fantasy XIV, a MMORPG, was released worldwide on Microsoft Windows in 2010, but it received heavy criticism when it was launched, prompting Square Enix to rerelease the game as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, this time to the PlayStation 3 as well, in 2013.[29] Final Fantasy XV is an action role-playing game that was released for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in 2016.[30][31] Originally a XIII spin-off titled Versus XIII, XV uses the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis series, although in many other respects the game stands on its own and has since been distanced from the series by its developers.[32][33][34][35][36][37]
When we initially arrived and spoke to the hostess, she was very short with us and honestly seemed like she didn't want to be there at all. It was so unpleasant that I honestly considered not dining at Kappa Sushi. I say this not to call her out, but to hopefully send a message to the business to reevaluate training for their front of house staff. They almost lost my business and have possibly lost other business due to this.
So what’s inside? Well, recent boxes have been themed to party games, food, and investigations. Some of the goodies inside have been Dixit, Boss Monster 2, Hoity Toity, Once Upon a Time, and Sushi Go!, so if you’re already a gamer and have a collection, you obviously run the risk of getting a game you already own. But that’s the risk with any blind box service, to be honest.

In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][83] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][84] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[85] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[86] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[87] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[88]
Max is a female pilot with a rocket-fueled cardboard box. If Sky Chasers looks familiar, that’s because it draws from the classic Lunar Lander. Players must operate a pair of thrusters to soar through magical worlds. The inventive levels in Sky Chasers hark back to the days of retro platformers, with bombastic traps, twisting tunnels, and larger-than-life enemies. By earning coins in each world, players can unlock more than two dozen new spaceships, all of which have very distinctive designs.
We’ve opened a small share of subscription boxes in this household, and while Board Game Bento is a good value, monetarily speaking, that is a standard feature of subscription boxes and we’ve come to expect it; on the other hand, we have received underwhelming subscription boxes before despite their contents’ cash value, so what usually preoccupies us when we are waiting for them is whether they will pass the “intrinsic value” test—that is, ignoring the contents’ price points, will the box be packed with goodness?   I can tell you that our first Board Game Bento passed this test, as we have already had a wonderful time playing Spyfall, and I am already cogitating strategies for our future play; Salem and Machine of Death look like fun games with unique themes as well, and I have high hopes for them.
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One of my favorite sushi restaurants. My bf and I ordered the creamy mermaids and chicken karaage to… One of my favorite sushi restaurants. My bf and I ordered the creamy mermaids and chicken karaage to start. The creamy mermaids are rolled up fried wontons with cream cheese and shrimp. It comes with sweet n sour dipping sauce. Soo yummy. Definitely need to order. The chicken karaage is the Japanese version of fried chicken. So good. Next we ordered 2 rolls. The surf and turf roll and the roll of the day which was a Hawaiian roll (I don't remember the name of it but remember it had Hawaiian in the name). The roll of the day was sooo good. Very refreshing and yummy. The surf and turf was good too but we both liked the roll of the day more. Afterwards we ordered one more roll (sorry forgot the name of this one too but it had tempura shrimp in it). Service and servers we patience and friendly. Read more
Not only is the box an impressive beast, it has colorful box art, in which Monopoly, Catan, and D&D are homaged in cartoons. Inside the box are three games, two of which were popular crowdfunding projects, and the other is a game with a lot of positive word of mouth buzz and several laurel wreaths, the most recent of which is an honorable mention for the 2016 Spiel des Jahres awards. Additionally, there were two expansion sets for one of the games, and a Board Game Bento mouse pad.

All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.
Recently, we received a sample subscription box from Board Game Bento (provided for us to review). The package comes monthly in a colorful box with a small collection of games. There’s a description of the specifics on their web site, but the basics are that for $50 a month you get an assortment of games set to you each month. Overall, it’s a very straightforward concept.
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