Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[131][132] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[133] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[134] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[133] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[115]
Taking a temporary divergence, Final Fantasy XI used the PlayStation 2's online capabilities as an MMORPG.[125] Initially released for the PlayStation 2 with a PC port arriving six months later, Final Fantasy XI was also released on the Xbox 360 nearly four years after its original release in Japan.[126] This was the first Final Fantasy game to use a free rotating camera. Final Fantasy XII was released in 2006 for the PlayStation 2 and uses only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X, in exchange for more advanced textures and lighting.[127][128] It also retains the freely rotating camera from Final Fantasy XI. Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy XIV both make use of Crystal Tools, a middleware engine developed by Square Enix.[129][130]
As I said, Board Game Bento guarantees at least an $80 value. The four games in this particular box retail for about $100. Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?
I’m a big fan of monster movies, the main reason being how much variety there is in the genre. There’s horror, of course, but even straight up scary movies have different types; like psychological horror or body horror. Movie monsters are often separated by subgenres, and this month’s games definitely capture that idea. To paraphrase a parody of prolific horror film auteur M. Night Shyamalan, what a Twisted Creature!
Investigate, the theme of May’s Board Game Bento, is not unknown to tabletop gamers, whether the classic mansion setting of Clue, or the psychic detectives in the seance simulator, Mysterium, or the more direct dungeon delving and looting of Dungeons & Dragons. In a way, every subscription box promises a mystery, so the Investigate themed Board Game Bento is the most sincere subscription box of them all, admitting to the opener that it is, indeed, a Schrodinger’s Cat of unknown contents—unless, of course, the user has sought spoilers on Google or unboxing videos on YouTube prior to its arrival.  On that note, if you’re a subscriber and you haven’t received your Board Game Bento this month, be aware that spoilers lie below, and proceeding would be like peeking in the Clue envelope.
Overall I have to say I wasn’t disappointed with what I got. I was lucky enough not to get any duplicate games for my collection and one of the games was on my “to buy” list. I was also happy that these games came from game companies that I already like  to purchase from and were rated pretty well on Board Game Geek, however we have to talk about the “bad stuff” too.
Important: Note that while this section will be somewhat monitored, personal topics related to your own orders, customer support related issues, and requests related to sales and promotion of the item are not guaranteed to be answered in a timely fashion by TOM staff. If you have an inquiry related to the TOM Shop rather than purely about the product, please contact us through the contact form.
Funky Truck turns off-road driving into an arcade sport. This single-player racing game features delightfully cartoonish graphics and over-the-top physics. Players can bounce, flip, and even fly in their monster trucks. With limited time on the clock, driving at high speeds is a necessity. Funky Truck’s creatively designed levels are filled with towering hills, frightening valleys, and ramps galore. Guts, glory, and a passion for thrills are all it takes to win.

My brother-in-law comes here regulary... like every week! And he highly recommends Kappa. He took us here to celebrate my birthday and we had a great Sunday night dinner! We made reservations in advance and the place was packed. I should have done a better job paying attention to what he was ordering, but everything we had was good! We started with some sashimi and nigiri items (including lobster tail and uni), then several rolls. My bro's favorite is the spam and eggs. For our 10-month old baby, we ordered her the avocado tempura and gyoza. She was having a great time enjoying her dishes! We also had creamy mermaid (which is like a crispy egg roll with cream cheese) sake, miso broth and ended with tempura ice cream. It was definitely a great birthday dinner because we tried a little bit of everything! I see why he comes here everytime he's craving sushi!
So what’s inside? Well, recent boxes have been themed to party games, food, and investigations. Some of the goodies inside have been Dixit, Boss Monster 2, Hoity Toity, Once Upon a Time, and Sushi Go!, so if you’re already a gamer and have a collection, you obviously run the risk of getting a game you already own. But that’s the risk with any blind box service, to be honest.

One day later:  The restaurant has gotten back with me and says that Bourbon & Butcher are open for lunch till 5 PM, and then the Corndance is open from 5PM on.  So, I guess that our gift certificate is no good for the Corndance, since the two are not the same, even though they are in the same building.  This is getting so confusing.  We do not normally go out for lunch, but guess that we need to have lunch there just to see what it's like.  They also say that the B & B name is on the Corndance sign, but neither one of us could see it and we were right outside.  They want me to change my review, and I wish that I could, but since I haven't actually eaten there yet, how can I upgrade my rating?  We'll get in there soon and then I'll take care of it.  I hope that we can find it this time.  It shouldn't be that hard to find, since they are both in the same building.  Wish I had known that yesterday.


Not only is the box an impressive beast, it has colorful box art, in which Monopoly, Catan, and D&D are homaged in cartoons. Inside the box are three games, two of which were popular crowdfunding projects, and the other is a game with a lot of positive word of mouth buzz and several laurel wreaths, the most recent of which is an honorable mention for the 2016 Spiel des Jahres awards. Additionally, there were two expansion sets for one of the games, and a Board Game Bento mouse pad.
In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][83] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][84] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[85] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[86] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[87] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[88]
Sorry about this rating, but right now I am so ticked that this is what you get.  We have a gift card for Bourbon & Butcher and was counting on some good food as we drove all over grape road trying to find this place.  The GPS kept taking us all around the Corn Dance, Outback and even the tire store, and could not find it.  Tried to call and was told by a recording that they opened at 5 PM, (it was 5:05).  After a great deal of time and being really hungry, we gave up and drove the 1/2 hour in traffic, rain and all, back to our little town where we had a great prime rib dinner.

I'm not a SD local - I'm from the LA area. What I do know is I've had quality sushi and sashimi and it's not here. The reviews are good but I personally was not satisfied or happy with the food I received. Service is good. Servers are polite and the restaurant itself has a nice ambience. Price is typical for a sushi place - it's fish so it's going to be expensive. I got the spicy garlic edamame, 2 piece salmon sushi, and Tazmanian Devil roll. The edamame and sushi were good - that's why I'm giving a 2 star review.. a star for each. The roll was not good. The spicy tuna in it was flavorless and when I took my first bite I questioned if the tuna was rancid. It wasn't rancid, just flavorless and bad quality. The roll was drenched in what seemed like vinegar and that didn't help the taste. I was thoroughly underwhelmed and if you've had quality AYCE or sushi, don't come here. I had some of my wife's CA roll and it was just alright. Not recommended unless you're in a pinch and have nowhere else to eat.
In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[93][94][95] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[94][96] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[97]
I'm not a SD local - I'm from the LA area. What I do know is I've had quality sushi and sashimi and it's not here. The reviews are good but I personally was not satisfied or happy with the food I received. Service is good. Servers are polite and the restaurant itself has a nice ambience. Price is typical for a sushi place - it's fish so it's going to be expensive. I got the spicy garlic edamame, 2 piece salmon sushi, and Tazmanian Devil roll. The edamame and sushi were good - that's why I'm giving a 2 star review.. a star for each. The roll was not good. The spicy tuna in it was flavorless and when I took my first bite I questioned if the tuna was rancid. It wasn't rancid, just flavorless and bad quality. The roll was drenched in what seemed like vinegar and that didn't help the taste. I was thoroughly underwhelmed and if you've had quality AYCE or sushi, don't come here. I had some of my wife's CA roll and it was just alright. Not recommended unless you're in a pinch and have nowhere else to eat.
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][83] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]
Because of graphical limitations, the first games on the NES feature small sprite representations of the leading party members on the main world screen. Battle screens use more detailed, full versions of characters in a side-view perspective. This practice was used until Final Fantasy VI, which uses detailed versions for both screens. The NES sprites are 26 pixels high and use a color palette of 4 colors. 6 frames of animation are used to depict different character statuses like "healthy" and "fatigued". The SNES installments use updated graphics and effects, as well as higher quality audio than in previous games, but are otherwise similar to their predecessors in basic design. The SNES sprites are 2 pixels shorter, but have larger palettes and feature more animation frames: 11 colors and 40 frames respectively. The upgrade allowed designers to have characters be more detailed in appearance and express more emotions. The first game includes non-player characters (NPCs) the player could interact with, but they are mostly static in-game objects. Beginning with the second game, Square used predetermined pathways for NPCs to create more dynamic scenes that include comedy and drama.[115]
If you’re not a subscriber currently, you might be asking just what is Board Game Bento?  Or, you don’t know what a subscription box is, which would probably mean that you’re not on social media or you’re muting or unfollowing everyone under the age of 35. Subscription boxes are all the rage nowadays; what’s better than a box full of goodies that you get each month, filled with different desirable items?
Three main installments, as well as one online game, were published for the PlayStation 2 (PS2).[15][16][17] Final Fantasy X (2001) introduced full 3D areas and voice acting to the series, and was the first to spawn a direct video game sequel (Final Fantasy X-2, published in 2003).[18][19] The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) in the series, Final Fantasy XI, was released on the PS2 and PC in 2002, and later on the Xbox 360.[20][21] It introduced real-time battles instead of random encounters.[21] Final Fantasy XII, published in 2006, also includes real-time battles in large, interconnected playfields.[22][23] The game is also the first in the main series to utilize a world used in a previous game, namely the land of Ivalice, which had previously featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story.[24]
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][83] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]
The first five games were directed by Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concepts.[74][102] He drew inspiration for game elements from anime films by Hayao Miyazaki; series staples like the airships and chocobos are inspired by elements in Castle in the Sky and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, respectively.[103] Sakaguchi served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[74][102] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[104][105][106] and has been followed by a new director for each new game. Hiroyuki Ito designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's "Job System", Final Fantasy VIII's "Junction System" and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX.[74][104] In designing the Active Time Battle system, Ito drew inspiration from Formula One racing; he thought it would be interesting if character types had different speeds after watching race cars pass each other.[107] Ito also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[74][104] Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first three games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He also worked as the scenario writer for the spin-off series, Kingdom Hearts.[108] Daisuke Watanabe co-wrote the scenarios for Final Fantasy X and XII, and was the main writer for the XIII games.[109][110][111]
Personally, for a Wednesday night it's pretty busy. You're jam packed close to strangers... and for me it... I found myself not enjoying conversing with my boyfriend cause I felt like everyone can here us... like the parties in both sides of us... it doesn't make for a private event at all. I wish the tables were spread out further apart so we could enjoy talking more.

More experienced gamers (who have been in the hobby at least two or three years) already have a rucksack of game plays to draw from when picking out new games. However, if an enterprising game group pools their money for a monthly delivery and finds a way to share the spoils, Board Game Bento is also beneficial because the games will stay in the group for multiple people to share.
If you’re not a subscriber currently, you might be asking just what is Board Game Bento?  Or, you don’t know what a subscription box is, which would probably mean that you’re not on social media or you’re muting or unfollowing everyone under the age of 35. Subscription boxes are all the rage nowadays; what’s better than a box full of goodies that you get each month, filled with different desirable items?
We were too full for dessert, but when the server said "cake in a can" and that we could take it home I said "yes please!" It is exactly as described. A blueberry sour cream cake in a soda can. It's packaged at the same place that their beer is brewed and is pressurized, so make sure to refrigerate until you are ready to eat it and eat it quickly because it is perishable. We ate later that day so it was totally safe and "uuuuuuuuuuu".

Ok, you all know how much I love board games, and you know that I’m a sucker for subscription boxes, right? Well, Board Game Bento combines both of these loves. Each box includes $80+ worth of games, expansions, and accessories, and they arrive in the mail each month. It’s like a regular built-in game night delivered right to your door! And they’ve got something special happening for the May box…
Three main installments, as well as one online game, were published for the PlayStation 2 (PS2).[15][16][17] Final Fantasy X (2001) introduced full 3D areas and voice acting to the series, and was the first to spawn a direct video game sequel (Final Fantasy X-2, published in 2003).[18][19] The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) in the series, Final Fantasy XI, was released on the PS2 and PC in 2002, and later on the Xbox 360.[20][21] It introduced real-time battles instead of random encounters.[21] Final Fantasy XII, published in 2006, also includes real-time battles in large, interconnected playfields.[22][23] The game is also the first in the main series to utilize a world used in a previous game, namely the land of Ivalice, which had previously featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story.[24]
Taking a temporary divergence, Final Fantasy XI used the PlayStation 2's online capabilities as an MMORPG.[125] Initially released for the PlayStation 2 with a PC port arriving six months later, Final Fantasy XI was also released on the Xbox 360 nearly four years after its original release in Japan.[126] This was the first Final Fantasy game to use a free rotating camera. Final Fantasy XII was released in 2006 for the PlayStation 2 and uses only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X, in exchange for more advanced textures and lighting.[127][128] It also retains the freely rotating camera from Final Fantasy XI. Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy XIV both make use of Crystal Tools, a middleware engine developed by Square Enix.[129][130]
Basically, what Corndance Tavern has done is section off a bit of the restaurant near the Corndance bar and turned it into a mini-restaurant/butcher shop. They have a little cold case with a selection of maybe 10 different meats that are shooting for an upmarket clientele. We're talking 55-day dry-aged beef, which if you know your steak is super difficult to find anywhere, not just South Bend. Alongside that are some nice pork chops and some house-made sausage.
$5 Deep Eddy Drinks $2.50 Coors & Miller Drafts $10 Pitchers of Miller Lite $3 Lagunitas IPA Draft Special Football Menu Happy Hour Menu Eats Mozzarella Sticks $7 Cheese Quesadilla $7 Pulled Pork Sliders $7 Peel & Eat Shrimp $7 Boneless Wings $7 Crab Balls $7 Bar Burger Sliders $8 Steamed Clams $8 Steamed Mussels $7 Drinks Miller Lite Draft $3 Coors Light Draft $3 Yuengling Bottle $2.5 Glass Of Wine $5 Orange Crush $6 Grapefruit Crush $6 Rocktown Vodka Martini $6

We’ve opened a small share of subscription boxes in this household, and while Board Game Bento is a good value, monetarily speaking, that is a standard feature of subscription boxes and we’ve come to expect it; on the other hand, we have received underwhelming subscription boxes before despite their contents’ cash value, so what usually preoccupies us when we are waiting for them is whether they will pass the “intrinsic value” test—that is, ignoring the contents’ price points, will the box be packed with goodness?   I can tell you that our first Board Game Bento passed this test, as we have already had a wonderful time playing Spyfall, and I am already cogitating strategies for our future play; Salem and Machine of Death look like fun games with unique themes as well, and I have high hopes for them.
In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[93][94][95] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[94][96] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[97]
I'm actually happy about Burger Boss since I figure this would actually get played more than FCM in my house. I also just learned about Foodfighters from The Game Boy Geek's review and I was hoping it would be included. I was even more pleased that one of the expansion factions was included as well. I already have Sushi Go, though I have an first edition from Adventureland Games, and the one in the box was the new one from Gamewright.
×