Biggs and Wedge, inspired by two Star Wars characters of the same name, appear in numerous games as minor characters, sometimes as comic relief.[23][73] The later games in the series feature several males with effeminate characteristics.[80][81] Recurring creatures include Chocobos and Moogles.[23] Chocobos are large, often flightless birds that appear in several installments as a means of long-distance travel for characters. Moogles, on the other hand, are white, stout creatures resembling teddy bears with wings and a single antenna. They serve different capacities in games including mail delivery, weaponsmiths, party members, and saving the game. Chocobo and Moogle appearances are often accompanied by specific musical themes that have been arranged differently for separate games.[3][23][73] Final Fantasy is also well known for its enemy monsters and creatures.[82]
Really enjoyed their happy hour here! Sushi here is pretty expensive but with 40 dollars st happy hour... you can really feed yourself here. My boyfriend and I cane for our monthaversary. Personally, for a Wednesday night it's pretty busy. You're jam packed close to strangers... and for me it... I found myself not enjoying conversing with my boyfriend cause I felt like everyone can here us... like the parties in both sides of us... it doesn't make for a private event at all. I wish the tables were spread out further apart so we could enjoy talking more. But we did manage to stuff our faces with ahi tacos, a spicy tuna hand roll, eel sushi, and a couple of their other special rolls. To be honest, the sushi wasn't that special compared to other places I've been... but the prices were relatively great! On the bright side, the waiters were kind, and the sushi chefs got food to you quickly.
The box then featured a pair of two-player titles. First up is Super Showdown by Touch Paper Press. The game is about the size of a paperback book, making it easy to pack up and take with you, and features graphics similar to the golden age of comics. The board itself is a square as long as a regular playing card. One takes the role of hero and the other villain as you take turns rolling dice and placing cards down to try and outsmart each other either with the highest card value during confrontations, being the only one at the center of Mayhem or trying to bust your opponent’s card total in a battle of wits. The game just takes a few minutes to learn and set up, and only 10 minutes to get an entire game in, meaning it’s great to use to pass a few minutes, or to use while waiting for the latest hero movie to start.

Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various media. Multiple anime and computer-generated imagery (CGI) films have been produced that are based either on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an original video animation (OVA), Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals, a sequel to Final Fantasy V. The story was set in the same world as the game, although 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes, first in Japan in 1994 and later in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998. In 2001, Square Pictures released its first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The film is set on a future Earth invaded by alien life forms.[45] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb and garnered mixed reviews.[45][46][47]
The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][95] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]
The first five games were directed by Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concepts.[74][102] He drew inspiration for game elements from anime films by Hayao Miyazaki; series staples like the airships and chocobos are inspired by elements in Castle in the Sky and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, respectively.[103] Sakaguchi served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[74][102] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[104][105][106] and has been followed by a new director for each new game. Hiroyuki Ito designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's "Job System", Final Fantasy VIII's "Junction System" and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX.[74][104] In designing the Active Time Battle system, Ito drew inspiration from Formula One racing; he thought it would be interesting if character types had different speeds after watching race cars pass each other.[107] Ito also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[74][104] Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first three games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He also worked as the scenario writer for the spin-off series, Kingdom Hearts.[108] Daisuke Watanabe co-wrote the scenarios for Final Fantasy X and XII, and was the main writer for the XIII games.[109][110][111]
Overall I have to say I wasn’t disappointed with what I got. I was lucky enough not to get any duplicate games for my collection and one of the games was on my “to buy” list. I was also happy that these games came from game companies that I already like  to purchase from and were rated pretty well on Board Game Geek, however we have to talk about the “bad stuff” too.
The Green Mile and Kappa Monster rolls are my favorites, with honorable mention to the Lemon roll and El Diablo. I do want to mention, in some of their rolls they use real blue crab not the fake Krab meat you find at other places, it has a different look and flavor. My boyfriend found it "too fishy" and thought it was spoiled Krab meat or something but he doesn't have the most refined of palates. Just keep in mind that it'll have a "fishier" flavor in case that's not your thing. I personally loved it.
I should have done a better job paying attention to what he was ordering, but everything we had was good! We started with some sashimi and nigiri items (including lobster tail and uni), then several rolls. My bro's favorite is the spam and eggs. For our 10-month old baby, we ordered her the avocado tempura and gyoza. She was having a great time enjoying her dishes!
The game indeed reversed Square's lagging fortunes, and it became the company's flagship franchise.[46][94] Following the success, Square immediately developed a second installment. Because Sakaguchi assumed Final Fantasy would be a stand-alone game, its story was not designed to be expanded by a sequel. The developers instead chose to carry over only thematic similarities from its predecessor, while some of the gameplay elements, such as the character advancement system, were overhauled. This approach has continued throughout the series; each major Final Fantasy game features a new setting, a new cast of characters, and an upgraded battle system.[5] Video game writer John Harris attributed the concept of reworking the game system of each installment to Nihon Falcom's Dragon Slayer series,[98] with which Square was previously involved as a publisher.[99] The company regularly released new games in the main series. However, the time between the releases of Final Fantasy XI (2002), Final Fantasy XII (2006), and Final Fantasy XIII (2009) were much longer than previous games. Following Final Fantasy XIV, Square Enix stated that it intended to release Final Fantasy games either annually or biennially. This switch was to mimic the development cycles of Western games in the Call of Duty, Assassin's Creed and Battlefield series, as well as maintain fan-interest.[100]
Board Game Bento, today’s sponsor, has a different theme each month, and they guarantee at least $80 worth of games and accessories in each box. A monthly subscription (with a month-to-month commitment and the ability to cancel anytime) will set you back $50 + s/h. Committing to a six-month subscription reduces that price a bit. So this box is pricier than the comic book version (and many other monthly subscription boxes), which obviously means you’re taking more of a risk.
The board game rules this game runs on are surprisingly fun, but the real value in this game are the 42 miniatures it comes with! All but one of them are recasts of minis from previous lines D&D has produced over the years (Including one huge red dragon bless them.) all for $42.89. I scoured this website and did the math, If you wanted to buy all these miniatures in their original painted versions it would cost $362.89. That is a HUGE amount of value! And the fact that these minis don't come painted isn't even much of a problem because after a wash with a soapy tooth brush and a base coat of gesso, they take paint very well and you can get them to look amazing all on your own!
The Green Mile and Kappa Monster rolls are my favorites, with honorable mention to the Lemon roll and El Diablo. I do want to mention, in some of their rolls they use real blue crab not the fake Krab meat you find at other places, it has a different look and flavor. My boyfriend found it "too fishy" and thought it was spoiled Krab meat or something but he doesn't have the most refined of palates. Just keep in mind that it'll have a "fishier" flavor in case that's not your thing. I personally loved it.
Starting with amazing customer service this place got to five stars before the food even arrived. We got a thorough education on the menu options, beers and operation of the restaurant. We started out with the steak tartar that was served with a raw quail egg still in its shell on top. We dumped the egg over the tar tar, mixed it in and enjoyed it on top of toasted brioche. Imagine I'm saying an inappropriate work right now and prolonging the "uuuuuuuuuu". We also got to sample some aged hot dogs, sliced on toasted brioche with a peanut sauce. Again with the "uuuuuuuuu". 

We came in around 9pm on a Saturday night and sat at the sushi bar. The sushi chef's and waiters were friendly. Husband had the calamari, as he is not much of a sushi fan. It was ok...too greasy and was too chewy. Sauce was good though. I had the miso scallop sushi and green mile roll. Both were great and I would get them again. Everything else I saw the chef make looked delicious. A lot of the rolls are tempura shrimp based, while I would have liked to see more of a raw selection.
Board Game Bento is a monthly subscription box for board gamers. I've never subscribed before but since there was a 25% off coupon for December and I wanted to treat myself for Christmas, I decided I would try out a one month subscription. The weather has been pretty yucky and the theme of the box was "Fun in the Sun; Not Sports 2" so I figured some summer games would be a good way to start off the new year. The box did end up being delayed due to weather, of course, but arrived late last week. 
Board Game Bento’s tag line is “A Box of Board Games Every Month,” with the additional promise that at least $80 worth of games are in every subscription box, and a monthly charge of $50 plus shipping and handling for a single box, or $270 plus shipping and handling for a six month subscription. To the uninitiated tabletop gamer, that could sound pricey, but when you understand that the good tabletop games range from 25 bucks to 75 bucks, with the sweet spot being around $50, you can see that getting a good board game subscription box can be a no-brainer if you are a hardcore gamer.
As I said, Board Game Bento guarantees at least an $80 value. The four games in this particular box retail for about $100. Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?
I love this spot. It's pricier than the other sushi spots in the area but it's worth it if you're looking for higher quality. Their happy hour is AWESOME. The drinks are cheap (sake!!) and they have a pretty extensive menu of appetizers and other items on HH. The Green Mile and Kappa Monster rolls are my favorites, with honorable mention to the Lemon roll and El Diablo. I do want to mention, in some of their rolls they use real blue crab not the fake Krab meat you find at other places, it has a different look and flavor. My boyfriend found it "too fishy" and thought it was spoiled Krab meat or something but he doesn't have the most refined of palates. Just keep in mind that it'll have a "fishier" flavor in case that's not your thing. I personally loved it. Lastly, this place is always packed for dinner so make a reservation if you can or show up as early as possible (they open for dinner at 5 and HH is until 6:30). Early is better though because you really don't want to miss their happy hour!
If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.
In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][83] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][84] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[85] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[86] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[87] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[88]
Investigate was our first Board Game Bento, and it was extremely impressive even before we saw the contents. By chance, I saw the UPS guy coming up to our porch with a bright red armful, and my first thought was “that huge box can’t be it, can it?” Usually, I can just crack the screen door and grab most deliveries with one hand, even most other subscription boxes like Loot Crate. I don’t have enormous hands, but I don’t have Donald Trump sized hands either. Board Game Bento Investigate is a 13″x11″x6.5″ box, so I had to open the screen door most of the way, step out onto the porch, and grab it with both hands, as its smallest side couldn’t possibly be grasped one handed except by this Ukranian strongman.

I love this spot. It's pricier than the other sushi spots in the area but it's worth it if you're looking for higher quality. Their happy hour is AWESOME. The drinks are cheap (sake!!) and they have a pretty extensive menu of appetizers and other items on HH. The Green Mile and Kappa Monster rolls are my favorites, with honorable mention to the Lemon roll and El Diablo. I do want to mention, in some of their rolls they use real blue crab not the fake Krab meat you find at other places, it has a different look and flavor. My boyfriend found it "too fishy" and thought it was spoiled Krab meat or something but he doesn't have the most refined of palates. Just keep in mind that it'll have a "fishier" flavor in case that's not your thing. I personally loved it. Lastly, this place is always packed for dinner so make a reservation if you can or show up as early as possible (they open for dinner at 5 and HH is until 6:30). Early is better though because you really don't want to miss their happy hour!

Wrath of Ashardalon is a fun game. Wrath of Ashardalon is the second d and d adventure system board game.The theme is more classic fantasy than Castle Ravenloft. The game is a bit easier too. Wrath has a campaign mode where you can complete multiple quests and carry over your characters. This is a neat addition. It plays much like Ravenloft, fun, fast, d and d light. The characters from each adventure system game can be used in all adventure system games and that is awesome.

which board game features the pop-o-matic bubble?

×