I’ve been reluctant to purchase a subscription to Board Game Bento because I already have so many board games at home and I was worried about getting duplicates while spending $60 on a bunch of games I didn’t really want. Don’t get me wrong, I think the idea is a fantastic one but I wasn’t sure if it was right for me, so I followed the Facebook Group for a bit and soon enough I found a theme I could get behind. “The Past”
The real deal breaker for me was finding several mistakes with the rule book so quickly. While reading the rules out loud to explain the game, my opponent was following along on their player screen. We found that the Push and Copy cards are illustrated incorrectly in the book as well as the rule book saying that you may pass a flag to a runner OR a defender but the player screen saying only a runner may pass or receive a flag. This put me off from the game and will likely prevent me from trying any of the variants.
BOARD GAME BENTO is a blind box subscription service for tabletop gaming enthusiasts. Every month, for as low as $45/month plus shipping & handling, subscribers receive at least $80 worth of board games and add-ons at their door step. Each box includes either three different games from three different publishers, or two games and an expansion for one of the included games. The add-ons tie into the month's theme and game content, making the experience of playing a game out of a Board Game Bento box different from playing the same game off the shelf.
Rick has locked the family inside their house. Why? Because the family has grown. Parasites masquerading as family and close friends have infiltrated and have inserted pleasant memories into everyone's minds to make them think they're real — and more keep coming! You must figure out which of these new, zany characters are real and which ones are parasites that need to be exterminated. Think you've got what it takes to save the world?
‪Join Gloryhoundd, @DrGloryHogg and @GregcDickson as they navigate the #Kickstarter gauntlet by breaking down #KingdomRush , #VampirethemasqueradeHeritage #dungeonologytheexpedition and #Roam ‬ ‪❤️ Link in the Bio ❤️‬ ‪#BoardGame #Reviews for @luckyduckgames @nice.game.publishing @ludusmagnus.studio @redravengames . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #boardgame #gamenight #boardgameaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #boardgamesofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #brettspiele #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #dungeonology #vampirethemasquerade #crowdfunding #kickstarterboardgames #talkshow #
High Noon Saloon by Slug Fest Games: I enjoy a lot of Red Dragon Inn but I hadn’t heard of this one before. Luckily for me I have someone in the house who loves westerns, so the game was well received. After opening it I wasn’t super impressed with the bits but after doing a little more research I was happy to see it got a decent BGG rating. Which was a huge plus for a game I hadn’t heard of before that was published five years ago. I’m really hoping this game will be a diamond in the rough.
In Final Fantasy games, players command a party of characters as they progress through the game's story by exploring the game world and defeating opponents.[3][74] Enemies are typically encountered randomly through exploring, a trend which changed in Final Fantasy XI and Final Fantasy XII. The player issues combat orders—like "Fight", "Magic", and "Item"—to individual characters via a menu-driven interface while engaging in battles. Throughout the series, the games have used different battle systems. Prior to Final Fantasy XI, battles were turn-based with the protagonists and antagonists on different sides of the battlefield. Final Fantasy IV introduced the "Active Time Battle" (ATB) system that augmented the turn-based nature with a perpetual time-keeping system. Designed by Hiroyuki Ito, it injected urgency and excitement into combat by requiring the player to act before an enemy attacks, and was used until Final Fantasy X, which implemented the "Conditional Turn-Based" (CTB) system.[3][23][83] This new system returned to the previous turn-based system, but added nuances to offer players more challenge.[19][84] Final Fantasy XI adopted a real-time battle system where characters continuously act depending on the issued command.[85] Final Fantasy XII continued this gameplay with the "Active Dimension Battle" system.[86] Final Fantasy XIII's combat system, designed by the same man who worked on X,[87] was meant to have an action-oriented feel, emulating the cinematic battles in Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children. The latest installment to the franchise, Final Fantasy XV, introduces a new "Open Combat" system. Unlike previous battle systems in the franchise, the "Open Combat" system (OCS) allows players to take on a fully active battle scenario, allowing for free range attacks and movement, giving a much more fluid feel of combat. This system also incorporates a "Tactical" Option during battle, which pauses active battle to allow use of items.[88]
With my purchase I was expecting more war games especially when visiting “The Past” so that was a bit of a disappointment to me but the main thing I didn’t like here was the price point. It wasn’t awful but I know what games I want and where to get them already so why do I need a $60 a month subscription for games i might already have as a veteran board gamer.
I tried Board Game Bento one month just as a present to myself. Honestly, I could have purchased all the games for cheaper from "that big online store." And there was one game I never would have purchased for myself, ever. It is a theme I just don't care for. The other 2 games I haven't played yet. Honestly I don't know if they are any good. I've never heard of either of them. There were a couple mini surprises in the box (which was nice), but it wasn't overwhelming.

choose your own adventure board game

×