The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]
Many Final Fantasy games have been included in various lists of top games. Several games have been listed on multiple IGN "Top Games" lists.[159][160][161][162][163][164] Eleven games were listed on Famitsu's 2006 "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time", four of which were in the top ten, with Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy VII coming first and second, respectively.[165] The series holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, which include the "Most Games in an RPG Series" (13 main games, seven enhanced games, and 32 spin-off games), the "Longest Development Period" (the production of Final Fantasy XII took five years), and the "Fastest-Selling Console RPG in a Single Day" (Final Fantasy X).[143][166] The 2009 edition listed two games from the series among the top 50 consoles games: Final Fantasy XII at number 8 and Final Fantasy VII at number 20.[167]
Final Fantasy has spawned numerous spin-offs and metaseries. Several are, in fact, not Final Fantasy games, but were rebranded for North American release. Examples include the SaGa series, rebranded The Final Fantasy Legend, and its two sequels, Final Fantasy Legend II and Final Fantasy Legend III.[38] Final Fantasy Mystic Quest was specifically developed for a United States audience, and Final Fantasy Tactics is a tactical RPG that features many references and themes found in the series.[39][40] The spin-off Chocobo series, Crystal Chronicles series, and Kingdom Hearts series also include multiple Final Fantasy elements.[38][41] In 2003, the Final Fantasy series' first direct sequel, Final Fantasy X-2, was released.[42] Final Fantasy XIII was originally intended to stand on its own, but the team wanted to explore the world, characters and mythos more, resulting in the development and release of two sequels in 2011 and 2013 respectively, creating the series' first official trilogy.[28] Dissidia Final Fantasy was released in 2009, a fighting game that features heroes and villains from the first ten games of the main series.[43] It was followed by a prequel in 2011.[44] Other spin-offs have taken the form of subseries—Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, Ivalice Alliance, and Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy.

Second is value.  Even if you went with Amazon prices instead of retail this is still a very good price for what you get. The games included this month are rated on board game geek ranging from 6.5-7.3 which is above average and way above what they could have put in the box, especially in a pop culture box. When you sign up  there is a one month plan for $50 or a 6 month plan for $45 a month. If you enjoy things such as loot crate or many of the other boxes that are out there or if you like to be surprised with games every month (i know i would like games to show up every month at my house) than this is for you.


Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[131][132] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[133] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[134] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[133] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[115]
I tried Board Game Bento one month just as a present to myself. Honestly, I could have purchased all the games for cheaper from "that big online store." And there was one game I never would have purchased for myself, ever. It is a theme I just don't care for. The other 2 games I haven't played yet. Honestly I don't know if they are any good. I've never heard of either of them. There were a couple mini surprises in the box (which was nice), but it wasn't overwhelming.

PBL Robots was also a neat surprise. To anyone that likes to play things like Battletech and such, this game is a winner. Players start with a pilot and construct the robot. This is all done with cards and the goal is to destroy your opponent’s robot. On your turn, players can either build or attack, so you have to manage your priorities in order to succeed. Robots is a keeper, for sure.
The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout.  Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo.  You get what you pay for!  (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)

vindication board game

×