Funky Truck turns off-road driving into an arcade sport. This single-player racing game features delightfully cartoonish graphics and over-the-top physics. Players can bounce, flip, and even fly in their monster trucks. With limited time on the clock, driving at high speeds is a necessity. Funky Truck’s creatively designed levels are filled with towering hills, frightening valleys, and ramps galore. Guts, glory, and a passion for thrills are all it takes to win.

Three Final Fantasy installments were released on the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES). Final Fantasy was released in Japan in 1987 and in North America in 1990.[2][3] It introduced many concepts to the console RPG genre, and has since been remade on several platforms.[3] Final Fantasy II, released in 1988 in Japan, has been bundled with Final Fantasy in several re-releases.[3][4][5] The last of the NES installments, Final Fantasy III, was released in Japan in 1990;[6] however, it was not released elsewhere until a Nintendo DS remake in 2006.[5]
Next up is a stand-alone expansion for the DC Comics Deck-Building game: Rivals – Batman vs. The Joker by Cryptozoic. The game is compatible with the other DC Comics Deck-Building games, and plays similar to many other deck builders like Ascension and Dominion: accrue power to buy better cards and actions. Eventually you’ll be able to build enough power up to take on Batman or The Joker with your deck to defeat the three oversized cards an opponent has. While I was personally hoping for a Legendary stand-alone, this has gotten me more interested in the DC deck-building titles.
Service problems galore on my most recent visits.  Last week they seemed to be without a bartender for most of the lunch hour.  10 minutes after I made my drink order, and having seen no bartender, I asked when my drink would be available. I was told the bartender would be there in another 10 minutes. It was another half an hour.  By the time I got my drink it had taken 45 minutes.  The manager made the drink complementary, but someone still left it on my bill and I had to ask for it to be removed.  Then, on my visit today, it took around 25 minutes for our food to come out.  We were informed the kitchen was backed up.  They weren't all that busy so this was odd.  And, once again, I had problems with my drink order.  I ordered a cocktail and they gave me the wrong liquor in it.  Then, there was a mad rush to find the correct liquor (mezcal).  After 10 mins or so I asked them to give up and said I would just order something else. However, when I said this the Mezcal Search Party disbanded and no one asked what else I would like to drink. It took another 10 minutes for the waitress to ask.  After I had informed the Mezcal Search Party to give up, someone had the common sense to say "take it off his bill", but the other person in the search party got all agitated at this and snapped that I was "not her table" leaving me to wonder if this would be taken care of (fortunately, it was).  I really don't appreciate employees getting all angry over basic stuff like this (or, if they do, they should do it away from customers).  Bourbon and Butcher seem incapable of providing timely, professional service.

Recently, we received a sample subscription box from Board Game Bento (provided for us to review). The package comes monthly in a colorful box with a small collection of games. There’s a description of the specifics on their web site, but the basics are that for $50 a month you get an assortment of games set to you each month. Overall, it’s a very straightforward concept.

Basically, what Corndance Tavern has done is section off a bit of the restaurant near the Corndance bar and turned it into a mini-restaurant/butcher shop. They have a little cold case with a selection of maybe 10 different meats that are shooting for an upmarket clientele. We're talking 55-day dry-aged beef, which if you know your steak is super difficult to find anywhere, not just South Bend. Alongside that are some nice pork chops and some house-made sausage.

Wormax.io is an eat-or-be-eaten multiplayer game. Strongly inspired by Slither.io, Wormax.io improves upon its predecessor in several big ways. Acceleration, Stop, and Ghost are three unlockable skills that make the gameplay much more dynamic and competitive. At any point during the game, players can slither over a multitude of boosters for extra health, vision, and magnetic abilities. Wormax.io also has excellent replay value, thanks to its unique “Artifact” currency and league system.
We’ve opened a small share of subscription boxes in this household, and while Board Game Bento is a good value, monetarily speaking, that is a standard feature of subscription boxes and we’ve come to expect it; on the other hand, we have received underwhelming subscription boxes before despite their contents’ cash value, so what usually preoccupies us when we are waiting for them is whether they will pass the “intrinsic value” test—that is, ignoring the contents’ price points, will the box be packed with goodness?   I can tell you that our first Board Game Bento passed this test, as we have already had a wonderful time playing Spyfall, and I am already cogitating strategies for our future play; Salem and Machine of Death look like fun games with unique themes as well, and I have high hopes for them.
I’ve been reluctant to purchase a subscription to Board Game Bento because I already have so many board games at home and I was worried about getting duplicates while spending $60 on a bunch of games I didn’t really want. Don’t get me wrong, I think the idea is a fantastic one but I wasn’t sure if it was right for me, so I followed the Facebook Group for a bit and soon enough I found a theme I could get behind. “The Past”

Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[131][132] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[133] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[134] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[133] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[115]
In Brick Party, players take turns building and explaining what to build. The catch is that each round there is a new special rule imposed on the players. These rules will make it more difficult for the players to build their structure, such as being blindfolded or having one hand tied behind your back. During the game you will have a new partner and a new special rule for each round.
Although most Final Fantasy installments are independent, many gameplay elements recur throughout the series.[72][73] Most games contain elements of fantasy and science fiction and feature recycled names often inspired from various cultures' history, languages and mythology, including Asian, European, and Middle-Eastern.[74] Examples include weapon names like Excalibur and Masamune—derived from Arthurian legend and the Japanese swordsmith Masamune respectively—as well as the spell names Holy, Meteor, and Ultima.[73][74] Beginning with Final Fantasy IV, the main series adopted its current logo style that features the same typeface and an emblem designed by Japanese artist Yoshitaka Amano. The emblem relates to a game's plot and typically portrays a character or object in the story. Subsequent remakes of the first three games have replaced the previous logos with ones similar to the rest of the series.[73]
Zombie Tower 3D is the big game item in this month’s box. The game can be played in two ways; semi-cooperatively or fully cooperatively! This game utilizes a unique 3D board that also acts as a screen, separating you from your teammates. In the game you must battle through hordes of zombies, and save survivors all while trying to stay alive. This game is very reminiscent of classic zombie movies and looks to have a very original style of game play.
Final Fantasy installments are generally stand-alone stories, each with different settings, plots and main characters, but the franchise is linked by several recurring elements, including game mechanics and recurring character names. Each plot centers on a particular group of heroes who are battling a great evil, but also explores the characters' internal struggles and relationships. Character names are frequently derived from the history, languages, pop culture, and mythologies of cultures worldwide. The mechanics of each game involve similar battle systems and maps.
Planet Surprise by Notre Game is a scratch and play, disposable game, much like scratch-off lottery tickets. I love playing scratch-off tickets, so I was intrigued, however, this one fell flat for me. Gianna and I tried this one and we both felt the same - it’s an interesting concept, but we didn’t feel it had any strategy involved or any real benefit to playing it against other people.

Two animated tie-ins for Final Fantasy XV were announced at the Uncovered Final Fantasy XV fan and press event, forming part of a larger multimedia project dubbed the Final Fantasy XV Universe. Brotherhood: Final Fantasy XV is a series of five 10-to-20-minute-long episodes developed by A-1 Pictures and Square Enix detailing the backstories of the main cast. Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV, a CGI movie set for release prior to the game in Summer 2016, is set during the game's opening and follows new and secondary characters.[58][59][60][61] In 26.2.2019 Square enix released a Short Anime called Final Fantasy XV: EPISODE ARDYN - PROLOGUE on their Youtube Channel which acts as the Backround Story for the Final piece of Dlc for Final Fantasy 15 giving insight into Ardyns Past.


If you haven’t played #koboldsatemybaby then you’re missing out on some serious #RPG shenanigans! It’s one of my favorite RPGs to introduce new players to as it’s simple to learn, can be played in a night AND opens players to light and creative collaborative thinking 😊 A fun RPG icebreaker. ❤️ @9thlevelgames . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #roleplayinggame #gamenight #rpgaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #rpgsofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #newgamers #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #beginner #d6system #criticalrole #kidsgames #kobolds
Starting with Final Fantasy VIII, the series adopted a more photo-realistic look.[122][123] Like Final Fantasy VII, full motion video (FMV) sequences would have video playing in the background, with the polygonal characters composited on top. Final Fantasy IX returned to the more stylized design of earlier games in the series, although it still maintained, and in many cases slightly upgraded, most of the graphical techniques used in the previous two games.[123] Final Fantasy X was released on the PlayStation 2, and used the more powerful hardware to render graphics in real-time instead of using pre-rendered material to obtain a more dynamic look; the game features full 3D environments, rather than have 3D character models move about pre-rendered backgrounds. It is also the first Final Fantasy game to introduce voice acting, occurring throughout the majority of the game, even with many minor characters.[19] This aspect added a whole new dimension of depth to the character's reactions, emotions, and development.[19][124]
Our main course comes out. Hubby had "The Butcher" burger, with a delightful side of green bean fries. and I had the "Hot Doug", with matchstick fries and a spicy ketchup. Hubby loved his burger. And so did I when I took my obligatory share. ;-) It was perfectly cooked, juicy and didn't fall a part. My Hot Doug was a sort of deconstructed hot dog, comprised of sliced duck sausage, each on its own toasted piece of brioche and sprinkled with hot mustard, gravy and fried foie gras. So good.
Overall I'm not really impressed with my box. Yes, I was happy about one of the games but I would have preferred two solid games over one solid and two mediocre games. I don't feel as though I've received a deal since two of the three games are unlikely to be played. I understand that this is the risk you take with mystery boxes but I just don't think Board Game Bento is going to be the right subscription box for me. 
$5 Deep Eddy Drinks $2.50 Coors & Miller Drafts $10 Pitchers of Miller Lite $3 Lagunitas IPA Draft Special Football Menu Happy Hour Menu Eats Mozzarella Sticks $7 Cheese Quesadilla $7 Pulled Pork Sliders $7 Peel & Eat Shrimp $7 Boneless Wings $7 Crab Balls $7 Bar Burger Sliders $8 Steamed Clams $8 Steamed Mussels $7 Drinks Miller Lite Draft $3 Coors Light Draft $3 Yuengling Bottle $2.5 Glass Of Wine $5 Orange Crush $6 Grapefruit Crush $6 Rocktown Vodka Martini $6 

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Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][83] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]

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