In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[93][94][95] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[94][96] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[97]
We were too full for dessert, but when the server said "cake in a can" and that we could take it home I said "yes please!" It is exactly as described. A blueberry sour cream cake in a soda can. It's packaged at the same place that their beer is brewed and is pressurized, so make sure to refrigerate until you are ready to eat it and eat it quickly because it is perishable. We ate later that day so it was totally safe and "uuuuuuuuuuu".
‪I’m looking forward to playing #Matryoshka this weekend!! @letimangames Coming to Kickstarter ‬May 8th! . . . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #boardgame #gamenight #boardgameaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #boardgamesofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #brettspiele #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #kickstarter #reviews #previews #crowdfunding #cardgame
Lastly is the much-honored Spyfall, which currently has a lot of buzz among the board game enthusiasts that subscribed to this box, as it was nominated for two Golden Geek awards, won the 2014 Best Party Game from the Dice Tower Gaming Awards, received a Major Fun! Award, and recently took a honorable mention in the announcement of this year’s Spiel des Jahres nominees.
I originally wasn't going to subscribe for this one as the theme didn't really interest me, but a discount offer, the mention that this box would have over $100 worth of games, and the hint that one of the games was a Spiel des Jahres nominee got me to give in. Based on the month's theme, I thought the SdJ nominee would've been Codenames or less likely, T.I.M.E. Stories. Alas, the "nominee" was Spyfall. Overall, I'm not very excited about this box as I don't play these types of games, though Salem looks interesting.
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]

Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[131][132] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[133] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[134] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[133] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[115]


Several games within the series have become best-selling games. At the end of 2007, the seventh, eighth, and ninth best-selling RPGs were Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, and Final Fantasy X respectively.[143] Final Fantasy VII has sold more than 11 million copies worldwide,[144] earning it the position of the best-selling Final Fantasy game.[145] Within two days of Final Fantasy VIII's North American release on September 9, 1999, it became the top-selling video game in the United States, a position it held for more than three weeks.[146] Final Fantasy X sold over 1.4 million Japanese units in pre-orders alone, which set a record for the fastest-selling console RPG.[143][147] The MMORPG, Final Fantasy XI, reached over 200,000 active daily players in March 2006[148] and had reached over half a million subscribers by July 2007.[46] Final Fantasy XII sold more than 1.7 million copies in its first week in Japan.[149] By November 6, 2006—one week after its release—Final Fantasy XII had shipped approximately 1.5 million copies in North America.[150] Final Fantasy XIII became the fastest-selling game in the franchise,[151] and sold one million units on its first day of sale in Japan.[152] Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, in comparison to its predecessor, was a runaway success, originally suffering from servers being overcrowded,[153] and eventually gaining over one million unique subscribers within two months of its launch.[154]
In 1995, Square showed an interactive SGI technical demonstration of Final Fantasy VI for the then next generation of consoles. The demonstration used Silicon Graphics's prototype Nintendo 64 workstations to create 3D graphics.[115][116] Fans believed the demo was of a new Final Fantasy game for the Nintendo 64 console; however, 1997 saw the release of Final Fantasy VII for the Sony PlayStation.[116][117] The switch was due to a dispute with Nintendo over its use of faster but more expensive cartridges, as opposed to the slower and cheaper, but much higher capacity Compact Discs used on rival systems.[118][119] Final Fantasy VII introduced 3D graphics with fully pre-rendered backgrounds.[118][120] It was because of this switch to 3D that a CD-ROM format was chosen over a cartridge format.[118][121] The switch also led to increased production costs and a greater subdivision of the creative staff for Final Fantasy VII and subsequent 3D games in the series.[72]

The series has received critical acclaim for the quality of its visuals and soundtracks.[46] In 1996, Next Generation ranked the series collectively as the 17th best game of all time, speaking very highly of its graphics, music and stories.[155] It was awarded a star on the Walk of Game in 2006, making it the first franchise to win a star on the event (other winners were individual games, not franchises). WalkOfGame.com commented that the series has sought perfection as well as having been a risk taker in innovation.[156] In 2006, GameFAQs held a contest for the best video game series ever, with Final Fantasy finishing as the runner-up to The Legend of Zelda.[157] In a 2008 public poll held by The Game Group plc, Final Fantasy was voted the best game series, with five games appearing in their "Greatest Games of All Time" list.[158]


Board Game Bento, today’s sponsor, has a different theme each month, and they guarantee at least $80 worth of games and accessories in each box. A monthly subscription (with a month-to-month commitment and the ability to cancel anytime) will set you back $50 + s/h. Committing to a six-month subscription reduces that price a bit. So this box is pricier than the comic book version (and many other monthly subscription boxes), which obviously means you’re taking more of a risk.

This product is supplied by Ultra Tokyo Connection for orders within the US and in some cases Canada. Supplies from Ultra Tokyo Connection will not have the Japanese licensor sticker as it is part of the manufacturer's North American supply only and not for sale within Japan, but will include proof of distribution by Ultra Tokyo Connection, a subsidiary of Good Smile Company, on the box.

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