Board Game Bento is a monthly subscription box for board gamers. I've never subscribed before but since there was a 25% off coupon for December and I wanted to treat myself for Christmas, I decided I would try out a one month subscription. The weather has been pretty yucky and the theme of the box was "Fun in the Sun; Not Sports 2" so I figured some summer games would be a good way to start off the new year. The box did end up being delayed due to weather, of course, but arrived late last week. 

I got to play #DeadlyDoodles by @stevejacksongames !! A new Dungeon crawling #flipandwrite ❤️❤️❤️ the art in this is super adorable and I love the erasable boards 😊 . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #boardgame #gamenight #boardgameaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #boardgamesofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #brettspiele #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #rollandwrite #drawandwrite #kidsgames #kids


Taking a temporary divergence, Final Fantasy XI used the PlayStation 2's online capabilities as an MMORPG.[125] Initially released for the PlayStation 2 with a PC port arriving six months later, Final Fantasy XI was also released on the Xbox 360 nearly four years after its original release in Japan.[126] This was the first Final Fantasy game to use a free rotating camera. Final Fantasy XII was released in 2006 for the PlayStation 2 and uses only half as many polygons as Final Fantasy X, in exchange for more advanced textures and lighting.[127][128] It also retains the freely rotating camera from Final Fantasy XI. Final Fantasy XIII and Final Fantasy XIV both make use of Crystal Tools, a middleware engine developed by Square Enix.[129][130]

This can make sense from a business point of view, but it is unfortunate in any event.  I am guessing part of the problem was getting the news of the product to its target audience.  Local gaming shops, for the most part, aren’t going to recommend essentially buying games from someone else, even if it is cheaper.  Gamers like myself with a large library (not to mention having to pay overseas shipping) are worried about spending big money on games we already have – it’s a bit of a hit and miss scenario.
Square Enix has expanded the Final Fantasy series into various media. Multiple anime and computer-generated imagery (CGI) films have been produced that are based either on individual Final Fantasy games or on the series as a whole. The first was an original video animation (OVA), Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals, a sequel to Final Fantasy V. The story was set in the same world as the game, although 200 years in the future. It was released as four 30-minute episodes, first in Japan in 1994 and later in the United States by Urban Vision in 1998. In 2001, Square Pictures released its first feature film, Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within. The film is set on a future Earth invaded by alien life forms.[45] The Spirits Within was the first animated feature to seriously attempt to portray photorealistic CGI humans, but was considered a box office bomb and garnered mixed reviews.[45][46][47]

The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) also featured three installments of the main series, all of which have been re-released on several platforms. Final Fantasy IV was released in 1991; in North America, it was released as Final Fantasy II.[7][8] It introduced the "Active Time Battle" system.[9] Final Fantasy V, released in 1992 in Japan, was the first game in the series to spawn a sequel: a short anime series, Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals.[3][10][11] Final Fantasy VI was released in Japan in 1994, titled Final Fantasy III in North America.[12]


Wormax.io is an eat-or-be-eaten multiplayer game. Strongly inspired by Slither.io, Wormax.io improves upon its predecessor in several big ways. Acceleration, Stop, and Ghost are three unlockable skills that make the gameplay much more dynamic and competitive. At any point during the game, players can slither over a multitude of boosters for extra health, vision, and magnetic abilities. Wormax.io also has excellent replay value, thanks to its unique “Artifact” currency and league system.

I got the spicy garlic edamame, 2 piece salmon sushi, and Tazmanian Devil roll. The edamame and sushi were good - that's why I'm giving a 2 star review.. a star for each. The roll was not good. The spicy tuna in it was flavorless and when I took my first bite I questioned if the tuna was rancid. It wasn't rancid, just flavorless and bad quality. The roll was drenched in what seemed like vinegar and that didn't help the taste.
First time out and I was just whelmed. Came with a group for lunch since we work within walking distance. Based on location, I always figured pricing was going to be on the higher end and my suspisions were correct. I opted for a bento box cause it was moderately priced for a lunch special. Bento box came with chicken katsu, rice, miso soup, tempura, and side salad. Katsu and tempura was pretty dry but at least my water and soup was moist. They get 3 stars for friendly service and clean facilities. If I'm pressed for time and in dire need of sushi I'll come back and give them another shot.
Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[131][132] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[133] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[134] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[133] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[115]
Where I think Board Game Bento should be headed, if they really want to shine in this industry, is by offering home delivery of the newest  board games released each month. Then you wouldn’t have to do all the research, driving or internet shopping to find what’s hot. They would just be waiting for you in the mailbox each month and I feel like many veteran gamers, like myself, would defiantly pay for that service.
May’s theme is “What’s Cooking.” This means it includes food/cooking-themed games and accessories, and they’ve asked me to write some recipes based on the games to be included in the box! No spoilers, but you’re gonna LOVE the box, and the recipes are all perfect game night snacks/treats. Want to check it out for yourself? You can save $10 off your order with code “HOSTESS”! You only have until May 2nd to sign up for the “What’s Cooking” box, so hustle on over! Check it out at www.boardgamebento.com.
Board Game Bento’s tag line is “A Box of Board Games Every Month,” with the additional promise that at least $80 worth of games are in every subscription box, and a monthly charge of $50 plus shipping and handling for a single box, or $270 plus shipping and handling for a six month subscription. To the uninitiated tabletop gamer, that could sound pricey, but when you understand that the good tabletop games range from 25 bucks to 75 bucks, with the sweet spot being around $50, you can see that getting a good board game subscription box can be a no-brainer if you are a hardcore gamer.
Writers for Board Game Quest are occasionally asked to evaluate a product that we might not be the main consumers for. In the case of a board game subscription service, receiving a monthly drop of board games is something we’re familiar with as a matter of course. For gamers out there paying for this type of service, you probably want to know what to expect.

One of my favorite sushi restaurants. My bf and I ordered the creamy mermaids and chicken karaage to start. The creamy mermaids are rolled up fried wontons with cream cheese and shrimp. It comes with sweet n sour dipping sauce. Soo yummy. Definitely need to order. The chicken karaage is the Japanese version of fried chicken. So good. Next we ordered 2 rolls. The surf and turf roll and the roll of the day which was a Hawaiian roll (I don't remember the name of it but remember it had Hawaiian in the name). The roll of the day was sooo good. Very refreshing and yummy. The surf and turf was good too but we both liked the roll of the day more. Afterwards we ordered one more roll (sorry forgot the name of this one too but it had tempura shrimp in it). Service and servers were patient and friendly.


This can make sense from a business point of view, but it is unfortunate in any event.  I am guessing part of the problem was getting the news of the product to its target audience.  Local gaming shops, for the most part, aren’t going to recommend essentially buying games from someone else, even if it is cheaper.  Gamers like myself with a large library (not to mention having to pay overseas shipping) are worried about spending big money on games we already have – it’s a bit of a hit and miss scenario.

house of danger board game

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