Kappa Sushi is located in the busy shopping center containing Trader Joe's and Board n Brew. This sushi restaurant is crowded nearly every evening of the week and the seating is extremely limited (about 50 people max). When checking in to the hostess booth, there is no waiting area. So, if there's a wait and it's cold outside, you have to wait in the cold like a hobo.
For the original Final Fantasy, Sakaguchi required a larger production team than Square's previous games. He began crafting the game's story while experimenting with gameplay ideas. Once the gameplay system and game world size were established, Sakaguchi integrated his story ideas into the available resources. A different approach has been taken for subsequent games; the story is completed first and the game built around it.[101] Designers have never been restricted by consistency, though most feel each game should have a minimum number of common elements. The development teams strive to create completely new worlds for each game, and avoid making new games too similar to previous ones. Game locations are conceptualized early in development and design details like building parts are fleshed out as a base for entire structures.[72]
For the original Final Fantasy, Sakaguchi required a larger production team than Square's previous games. He began crafting the game's story while experimenting with gameplay ideas. Once the gameplay system and game world size were established, Sakaguchi integrated his story ideas into the available resources. A different approach has been taken for subsequent games; the story is completed first and the game built around it.[101] Designers have never been restricted by consistency, though most feel each game should have a minimum number of common elements. The development teams strive to create completely new worlds for each game, and avoid making new games too similar to previous ones. Game locations are conceptualized early in development and design details like building parts are fleshed out as a base for entire structures.[72]
Despite having 25% off my subscription, once the cost of shipping and the USD to CAD exchange were applied, I was still paying about $75 Canadian.  Add another 25% to the cost and that is a hefty price tag for some mystery games. It might be more worthwhile if you were purchasing and shipping within the US but I'm not about to recommend it for my Canadian readers.  
If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

I’ve been reluctant to purchase a subscription to Board Game Bento because I already have so many board games at home and I was worried about getting duplicates while spending $60 on a bunch of games I didn’t really want. Don’t get me wrong, I think the idea is a fantastic one but I wasn’t sure if it was right for me, so I followed the Facebook Group for a bit and soon enough I found a theme I could get behind. “The Past”
Recently, we received a sample subscription box from Board Game Bento (provided for us to review). The package comes monthly in a colorful box with a small collection of games. There’s a description of the specifics on their web site, but the basics are that for $50 a month you get an assortment of games set to you each month. Overall, it’s a very straightforward concept.
There is no boring food served here!  What a fun place to try gourmet aged meats.  We had a charcuterie platter and their Daily Special Bento Box.  The platter was full of yummy sliced meats, cheeses, bread, mini pickles, dipping sauces/spreads.  The Bento Box was a fun mix of gourmet delights.  The Butchers Wife salad in the Bento Box was delicious.  The brewed ice tea was perfect.  On the other hand, my husband didn't love it and he was still hungry afterwards.  He thought it was too expensive for what we got.  But he was grouchy all day so take that with a grain of salt.  ;-)
Board Game Bento is a monthly subscription box for board gamers. I've never subscribed before but since there was a 25% off coupon for December and I wanted to treat myself for Christmas, I decided I would try out a one month subscription. The weather has been pretty yucky and the theme of the box was "Fun in the Sun; Not Sports 2" so I figured some summer games would be a good way to start off the new year. The box did end up being delayed due to weather, of course, but arrived late last week. 
Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[131][132] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[133] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[134] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[133] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[115]
The real deal breaker for me was finding several mistakes with the rule book so quickly. While reading the rules out loud to explain the game, my opponent was following along on their player screen. We found that the Push and Copy cards are illustrated incorrectly in the book as well as the rule book saying that you may pass a flag to a runner OR a defender but the player screen saying only a runner may pass or receive a flag. This put me off from the game and will likely prevent me from trying any of the variants.

The box then featured a pair of two-player titles. First up is Super Showdown by Touch Paper Press. The game is about the size of a paperback book, making it easy to pack up and take with you, and features graphics similar to the golden age of comics. The board itself is a square as long as a regular playing card. One takes the role of hero and the other villain as you take turns rolling dice and placing cards down to try and outsmart each other either with the highest card value during confrontations, being the only one at the center of Mayhem or trying to bust your opponent’s card total in a battle of wits. The game just takes a few minutes to learn and set up, and only 10 minutes to get an entire game in, meaning it’s great to use to pass a few minutes, or to use while waiting for the latest hero movie to start.
The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) also featured three installments of the main series, all of which have been re-released on several platforms. Final Fantasy IV was released in 1991; in North America, it was released as Final Fantasy II.[7][8] It introduced the "Active Time Battle" system.[9] Final Fantasy V, released in 1992 in Japan, was the first game in the series to spawn a sequel: a short anime series, Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals.[3][10][11] Final Fantasy VI was released in Japan in 1994, titled Final Fantasy III in North America.[12]

Following in the successful footsteps of Agar.io, Slither.io is essentially multiplayer Snake for the 21st century. Players begin as small snakes, and they must eat food (i.e. little blobs on the map) to grow. Larger snakes have an easier time trapping smaller ones and making them disappear. When an enemy snake gets trapped, it will become food for others. The simplicity of Slither.io makes it a great choice for quick, fun multiplayer gaming when bored. Plus, a broad selection of neon-colored skins results in eye-catching, pleasing graphics.
The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout.  Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo.  You get what you pay for!  (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)

Max is a female pilot with a rocket-fueled cardboard box. If Sky Chasers looks familiar, that’s because it draws from the classic Lunar Lander. Players must operate a pair of thrusters to soar through magical worlds. The inventive levels in Sky Chasers hark back to the days of retro platformers, with bombastic traps, twisting tunnels, and larger-than-life enemies. By earning coins in each world, players can unlock more than two dozen new spaceships, all of which have very distinctive designs.
The box then featured a pair of two-player titles. First up is Super Showdown by Touch Paper Press. The game is about the size of a paperback book, making it easy to pack up and take with you, and features graphics similar to the golden age of comics. The board itself is a square as long as a regular playing card. One takes the role of hero and the other villain as you take turns rolling dice and placing cards down to try and outsmart each other either with the highest card value during confrontations, being the only one at the center of Mayhem or trying to bust your opponent’s card total in a battle of wits. The game just takes a few minutes to learn and set up, and only 10 minutes to get an entire game in, meaning it’s great to use to pass a few minutes, or to use while waiting for the latest hero movie to start.
Basically, what Corndance Tavern has done is section off a bit of the restaurant near the Corndance bar and turned it into a mini-restaurant/butcher shop. They have a little cold case with a selection of maybe 10 different meats that are shooting for an upmarket clientele. We're talking 55-day dry-aged beef, which if you know your steak is super difficult to find anywhere, not just South Bend. Alongside that are some nice pork chops and some house-made sausage.

Kappa Sushi is located in the busy shopping center containing Trader Joe's and Board n Brew. This sushi restaurant is crowded nearly every evening of the week and the seating is extremely limited (about 50 people max). When checking in to the hostess booth, there is no waiting area. So, if there's a wait and it's cold outside, you have to wait in the cold like a hobo. When you actually do get a seat, the dining room is tiny, but very comfortable. The menu is pretty huge with a lot of different items. In particular, their sushi roll selection is AMAZING! The Surf n Turf Roll, containing Kobe beef and lobster is flavorful and cooked to perfection! The Lemon Roll is very tangy throughout the roll, but very good! The BEST Roll is the Sancho Roll! The jumbo shrimp, blue crab, and seared albacore go perfect with the jalapeño ponzu sauce! The Spicy Garlic Edamame was a miss as the sauce tasted very watered down and bland. The prices of the rolls range from $10-$16, so a little on the pricey side... but the fresh delicious ingredients make it worth it. I'd come back just for the Sancho Roll and order 3 of them! They have an awesome happy hour too! 5 stars overall!

I've been wanting to make a chit puller for Dirtside II, but my programming experience is mostly in Visual BASIC, and I haven't had the time to sit down and learn Objective-C or Cocoa Touch or Snow Tiger or Buttered Monkey or whatever it's called this week. I think once I learned the syntax, I could do a reasonably competent job, because I've already worked out all the logic behind the chit puller; I just need to translate that into Obj-C code.
We came in around 9pm on a Saturday night and sat at the sushi bar. The sushi chef's and waiters were friendly. Husband had the calamari, as he is not much of a sushi fan. It was ok...too greasy and was too chewy. Sauce was good though. I had the miso scallop sushi and green mile roll. Both were great and I would get them again. Everything else I saw the chef make looked delicious. A lot of the rolls are tempura shrimp based, while I would have liked to see more of a raw selection.
The biggest game in the box belongs to Heroes Wanted by Action Phase Games. The game, for one to five players, has players making their heroes using a pair of cards, with strengths and weaknesses, as well as a unique quirk. Players then take on villains, minions and each other to become the hero with the most fame at the end of the game. The game features quite a few scenarios to try as well. Between the scenarios and the variety of heroes you can become, Heroes Wanted will offer quite a bit of replay.

teotihuacan board game

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