So what’s inside? Well, recent boxes have been themed to party games, food, and investigations. Some of the goodies inside have been Dixit, Boss Monster 2, Hoity Toity, Once Upon a Time, and Sushi Go!, so if you’re already a gamer and have a collection, you obviously run the risk of getting a game you already own. But that’s the risk with any blind box service, to be honest.
Many Final Fantasy games have been included in various lists of top games. Several games have been listed on multiple IGN "Top Games" lists.[159][160][161][162][163][164] Eleven games were listed on Famitsu's 2006 "Top 100 Favorite Games of All Time", four of which were in the top ten, with Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy VII coming first and second, respectively.[165] The series holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008, which include the "Most Games in an RPG Series" (13 main games, seven enhanced games, and 32 spin-off games), the "Longest Development Period" (the production of Final Fantasy XII took five years), and the "Fastest-Selling Console RPG in a Single Day" (Final Fantasy X).[143][166] The 2009 edition listed two games from the series among the top 50 consoles games: Final Fantasy XII at number 8 and Final Fantasy VII at number 20.[167]
I decided not to sub to Bento because of the fact they just blindly send you something. Subscribed to Game Box Monthly instead since Brian actually tries to find something you don't have. I have a prepaid 6 month sub there. My husband also got me AwesomePack for my birthday. After 6 boxes, I'll cancel if they haven't proven to be good fits for us (especially since I got GBM on sale @ 50% discount).
The first five games were directed by Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concepts.[74][102] He drew inspiration for game elements from anime films by Hayao Miyazaki; series staples like the airships and chocobos are inspired by elements in Castle in the Sky and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, respectively.[103] Sakaguchi served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[74][102] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[104][105][106] and has been followed by a new director for each new game. Hiroyuki Ito designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's "Job System", Final Fantasy VIII's "Junction System" and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX.[74][104] In designing the Active Time Battle system, Ito drew inspiration from Formula One racing; he thought it would be interesting if character types had different speeds after watching race cars pass each other.[107] Ito also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[74][104] Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first three games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He also worked as the scenario writer for the spin-off series, Kingdom Hearts.[108] Daisuke Watanabe co-wrote the scenarios for Final Fantasy X and XII, and was the main writer for the XIII games.[109][110][111]
As I said, they guarantee at least an $80 value, and they also promise at least three different games in each box (or two games and an expansion). Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?
Kappa Sushi is located in the busy shopping center containing Trader Joe's and Board n Brew. This sushi restaurant is crowded nearly every evening of the week and the seating is extremely limited (about 50 people max). When checking in to the hostess booth, there is no waiting area. So, if there's a wait and it's cold outside, you have to wait in the cold like a hobo. When you actually do get a seat, the dining room is tiny, but very comfortable. The menu is pretty huge with a lot of different items. In particular, their sushi roll selection is AMAZING! The Surf n Turf Roll, containing Kobe beef and lobster is flavorful and cooked to perfection! The Lemon Roll is very tangy throughout the roll, but very good! The BEST Roll is the Sancho Roll! The jumbo shrimp, blue crab, and seared albacore go perfect with the jalapeño ponzu sauce! The Spicy Garlic Edamame was a miss as the sauce tasted very watered down and bland. The prices of the rolls range from $10-$16, so a little on the pricey side... but the fresh delicious ingredients make it worth it. I'd come back just for the Sancho Roll and order 3 of them! They have an awesome happy hour too! 5 stars overall!
Second is value.  Even if you went with Amazon prices instead of retail this is still a very good price for what you get. The games included this month are rated on board game geek ranging from 6.5-7.3 which is above average and way above what they could have put in the box, especially in a pop culture box. When you sign up  there is a one month plan for $50 or a 6 month plan for $45 a month. If you enjoy things such as loot crate or many of the other boxes that are out there or if you like to be surprised with games every month (i know i would like games to show up every month at my house) than this is for you.
Despite having 25% off my subscription, once the cost of shipping and the USD to CAD exchange were applied, I was still paying about $75 Canadian.  Add another 25% to the cost and that is a hefty price tag for some mystery games. It might be more worthwhile if you were purchasing and shipping within the US but I'm not about to recommend it for my Canadian readers.  
The first installment of the series was released in Japan on December 18, 1987. Subsequent games are numbered and given a story unrelated to previous games, so the numbers refer to volumes rather than to sequels. Many Final Fantasy games have been localized for markets in North America, Europe, and Australia on numerous video game consoles, personal computers (PC), and mobile phones. Future installments will appear on seventh and eighth generation consoles. As of November 2016, the series includes the main installments from Final Fantasy to Final Fantasy XV, as well as direct sequels and spin-offs, both released and confirmed as being in development. Most of the older games have been remade or re-released on multiple platforms.[1]
Final Fantasy[a] is a Japanese science fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Square). The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs/JRPGs). The first game in the series was released in 1987, with 14 other main-numbered entries being released since then. The franchise has since branched into other video game genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm, as well as branching into other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels.
The Final Fantasy series and several specific games within it have been credited for introducing and popularizing many concepts that are today widely used in console RPGs.[3][117] The original game is often cited as one of the most influential early console RPGs, and played a major role in legitimizing and popularizing the genre. Many console RPGs featured one-on-one battles against monsters from a first-person perspective. Final Fantasy introduced a side view perspective with groups of monsters against a group of characters that has been frequently used.[3][95][117] It also introduced an early evolving class change system,[195][196] as well as different methods of transportation, including a ship, canoe, and flying airship.[197] Final Fantasy II was the first sequel in the industry to omit characters and locations from the previous game.[5] It also introduced an activity-based progression system,[198] which has been used in later RPG series such as SaGa,[199] Grandia,[200] and The Elder Scrolls.[198] Final Fantasy III introduced the job system, a character progression engine allowing the player to change character classes, as well as acquire new and advanced classes and combine class abilities, at any time during the game.[201] Final Fantasy IV is considered a milestone for the genre, introducing a dramatic storyline with a strong emphasis on character development and personal relationships.[202] Final Fantasy VII is credited as having the largest industry impact of the series,[118] and with allowing console role-playing games to gain mass-market appeal.[203]

MacKenzie Paulus, Megan Fulton, Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro


Because of graphical limitations, the first games on the NES feature small sprite representations of the leading party members on the main world screen. Battle screens use more detailed, full versions of characters in a side-view perspective. This practice was used until Final Fantasy VI, which uses detailed versions for both screens. The NES sprites are 26 pixels high and use a color palette of 4 colors. 6 frames of animation are used to depict different character statuses like "healthy" and "fatigued". The SNES installments use updated graphics and effects, as well as higher quality audio than in previous games, but are otherwise similar to their predecessors in basic design. The SNES sprites are 2 pixels shorter, but have larger palettes and feature more animation frames: 11 colors and 40 frames respectively. The upgrade allowed designers to have characters be more detailed in appearance and express more emotions. The first game includes non-player characters (NPCs) the player could interact with, but they are mostly static in-game objects. Beginning with the second game, Square used predetermined pathways for NPCs to create more dynamic scenes that include comedy and drama.[115]

As I said, they guarantee at least an $80 value, and they also promise at least three different games in each box (or two games and an expansion). Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?
We’ve opened a small share of subscription boxes in this household, and while Board Game Bento is a good value, monetarily speaking, that is a standard feature of subscription boxes and we’ve come to expect it; on the other hand, we have received underwhelming subscription boxes before despite their contents’ cash value, so what usually preoccupies us when we are waiting for them is whether they will pass the “intrinsic value” test—that is, ignoring the contents’ price points, will the box be packed with goodness?   I can tell you that our first Board Game Bento passed this test, as we have already had a wonderful time playing Spyfall, and I am already cogitating strategies for our future play; Salem and Machine of Death look like fun games with unique themes as well, and I have high hopes for them.
The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout.  Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo.  You get what you pay for!  (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)

vindication board game

×