When we initially arrived and spoke to the hostess, she was very short with us and honestly seemed like she didn't want to be there at all. It was so unpleasant that I honestly considered not dining at Kappa Sushi. I say this not to call her out, but to hopefully send a message to the business to reevaluate training for their front of house staff. They almost lost my business and have possibly lost other business due to this.
Wow, only people in there and took over an hour for lunch..... 45 minutes in they brought a bite of food it was good but not worth that. also expensive. Super weird menu very much hipster yuppie vibe like Super special goat fart cheese only harvested under a full moon by a one legged Aquarius.....I just wanted lunch people. anyways..... It did taste good but not my style.
BOARD GAME BENTO is a blind box subscription service for tabletop gaming enthusiasts. Every month, for as low as $45/month plus shipping & handling, subscribers receive at least $80 worth of board games and add-ons at their door step. Each box includes either three different games from three different publishers, or two games and an expansion for one of the included games. The add-ons tie into the month's theme and game content, making the experience of playing a game out of a Board Game Bento box different from playing the same game off the shelf.
The first five games were directed by Sakaguchi, who also provided the original concepts.[74][102] He drew inspiration for game elements from anime films by Hayao Miyazaki; series staples like the airships and chocobos are inspired by elements in Castle in the Sky and Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, respectively.[103] Sakaguchi served as a producer for subsequent games until he left Square in 2001.[74][102] Yoshinori Kitase took over directing the games until Final Fantasy VIII,[104][105][106] and has been followed by a new director for each new game. Hiroyuki Ito designed several gameplay systems, including Final Fantasy V's "Job System", Final Fantasy VIII's "Junction System" and the Active Time Battle concept, which was used from Final Fantasy IV until Final Fantasy IX.[74][104] In designing the Active Time Battle system, Ito drew inspiration from Formula One racing; he thought it would be interesting if character types had different speeds after watching race cars pass each other.[107] Ito also co-directed Final Fantasy VI with Kitase.[74][104] Kenji Terada was the scenario writer for the first three games; Kitase took over as scenario writer for Final Fantasy V through Final Fantasy VII. Kazushige Nojima became the series' primary scenario writer from Final Fantasy VII until his resignation in October 2003; he has since formed his own company, Stellavista. Nojima partially or completely wrote the stories for Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII, Final Fantasy X, and Final Fantasy X-2. He also worked as the scenario writer for the spin-off series, Kingdom Hearts.[108] Daisuke Watanabe co-wrote the scenarios for Final Fantasy X and XII, and was the main writer for the XIII games.[109][110][111]

Nobuo Uematsu was the chief music composer of the Final Fantasy series until his resignation from Square Enix in November 2004.[46] Other composers include Masashi Hamauzu, Hitoshi Sakimoto[131][132] and Junya Nakano. Uematsu was allowed to create much of the music with little direction from the production staff. Sakaguchi, however, would request pieces to fit specific game scenes including battles and exploring different areas of the game world.[133] Once a game's major scenarios were completed, Uematsu would begin writing the music based on the story, characters, and accompanying artwork. He started with a game's main theme, and developed other pieces to match its style. In creating character themes, Uematsu read the game's scenario to determine the characters' personality. He would also ask the scenario writer for more details to scenes he was unsure about.[134] Technical limitations were prevalent in earlier games; Sakaguchi would sometimes instruct Uematsu to only use specific notes.[133] It was not until Final Fantasy IV on the SNES that Uematsu was able to add more subtlety to the music.[115]
Magic is another common RPG element in the series. The method by which characters gain magic varies between installments, but is generally divided into classes organized by color: "White magic", which focuses on spells that assist teammates; "Black magic", which focuses on harming enemies; "Red magic", which is a combination of white and black magic, "Blue magic", which mimics enemy attacks; and "Green magic" which focuses on applying status effects to either allies or enemies.[3][73][83] Other types of magic frequently appear such as "Time magic", focusing on the themes of time, space, and gravity; and "Summoning magic", which evokes legendary creatures to aid in battle and is a feature that has persisted since Final Fantasy III. Summoned creatures are often referred to by names like "Espers" or "Eidolons" and have been inspired by mythologies from Arabic, Hindu, Norse, and Greek cultures.[73][74]

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