Summer time is fun time, so get ready to get loud with four games that are great for large groups of good friends. Play them on the patio after a barbecue, or inside by the AC. With a wide variety of themes and play styles, and three new games (two from 2015, one hot off the press from 2016) as well as an older game that still knows a good time, Board Game Bento’s PARTY! box is a box of fun like never before.

World’s Fair 1983 by Renegade/Foxtrot Games: When When I opened the box I was very excited to see this game. It was their advertised Mensa Select Game and  it’s made by a publisher I love (they make Lanterns and Lotus). On top of that it scored extra points in my book because it was on my “want list” but not yet in my collection. Whomever picked this game out for the Bento Box certainly deserves a crisp high five as it is a gem.
As I said, Board Game Bento guarantees at least an $80 value. The four games in this particular box retail for about $100. Some boxes also include accessories, such as dice or other ephemera, so your mileage may vary from month to month. However, a one-month subscription would make a great gift idea for any gamers you know. Because let’s be honest: who doesn’t love opening a mystery box?
Sorry about this rating, but right now I am so ticked that this is what you get.  We have a gift card for Bourbon & Butcher and was counting on some good food as we drove all over grape road trying to find this place.  The GPS kept taking us all around the Corn Dance, Outback and even the tire store, and could not find it.  Tried to call and was told by a recording that they opened at 5 PM, (it was 5:05).  After a great deal of time and being really hungry, we gave up and drove the 1/2 hour in traffic, rain and all, back to our little town where we had a great prime rib dinner.
Overall I have to say I wasn’t disappointed with what I got. I was lucky enough not to get any duplicate games for my collection and one of the games was on my “to buy” list. I was also happy that these games came from game companies that I already like  to purchase from and were rated pretty well on Board Game Geek, however we have to talk about the “bad stuff” too.

The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]

As for the quality of the games, they appear to come from experienced publishers. None of the games included generally have stellar ratings, but we would not call any of the titles “bad” games. They’re not the cream of the gaming crop, but they also don’t appear to be games that would get seriously negative ratings from us. That being said, one month’s game box included Walled City: Londonderry and Borderlands which happens to be one of my favorite games of all time.
I love this spot. It's pricier than the other sushi spots in the area but it's worth it if you're looking for higher quality. Their happy hour is AWESOME. The drinks are cheap (sake!!) and they have a pretty extensive menu of appetizers and other items on HH. The Green Mile and Kappa Monster rolls are my favorites, with honorable mention to the Lemon roll and El Diablo. I do want to mention, in some of their rolls they use real blue crab not the fake Krab meat you find at other places, it has a different look and flavor. My boyfriend found it "too fishy" and thought it was spoiled Krab meat or something but he doesn't have the most refined of palates. Just keep in mind that it'll have a "fishier" flavor in case that's not your thing. I personally loved it. Lastly, this place is always packed for dinner so make a reservation if you can or show up as early as possible (they open for dinner at 5 and HH is until 6:30). Early is better though because you really don't want to miss their happy hour!
Starting with Final Fantasy VIII, the series adopted a more photo-realistic look.[122][123] Like Final Fantasy VII, full motion video (FMV) sequences would have video playing in the background, with the polygonal characters composited on top. Final Fantasy IX returned to the more stylized design of earlier games in the series, although it still maintained, and in many cases slightly upgraded, most of the graphical techniques used in the previous two games.[123] Final Fantasy X was released on the PlayStation 2, and used the more powerful hardware to render graphics in real-time instead of using pre-rendered material to obtain a more dynamic look; the game features full 3D environments, rather than have 3D character models move about pre-rendered backgrounds. It is also the first Final Fantasy game to introduce voice acting, occurring throughout the majority of the game, even with many minor characters.[19] This aspect added a whole new dimension of depth to the character's reactions, emotions, and development.[19][124]

World’s Fair 1983 by Renegade/Foxtrot Games: When When I opened the box I was very excited to see this game. It was their advertised Mensa Select Game and  it’s made by a publisher I love (they make Lanterns and Lotus). On top of that it scored extra points in my book because it was on my “want list” but not yet in my collection. Whomever picked this game out for the Bento Box certainly deserves a crisp high five as it is a gem.


In 2009, Final Fantasy XIII was released in Japan, and in North America and Europe the following year, for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.[25][26] It is the flagship installment of the Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy series[27] and became the first mainline game to spawn two direct sequels (XIII-2 and Lightning Returns).[28] It was also the first game released in Chinese & High Definition along with being released on two consoles at once. Final Fantasy XIV, a MMORPG, was released worldwide on Microsoft Windows in 2010, but it received heavy criticism when it was launched, prompting Square Enix to rerelease the game as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, this time to the PlayStation 3 as well, in 2013.[29] Final Fantasy XV is an action role-playing game that was released for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in 2016.[30][31] Originally a XIII spin-off titled Versus XIII, XV uses the mythos of the Fabula Nova Crystallis series, although in many other respects the game stands on its own and has since been distanced from the series by its developers.[32][33][34][35][36][37]
The box then featured a pair of two-player titles. First up is Super Showdown by Touch Paper Press. The game is about the size of a paperback book, making it easy to pack up and take with you, and features graphics similar to the golden age of comics. The board itself is a square as long as a regular playing card. One takes the role of hero and the other villain as you take turns rolling dice and placing cards down to try and outsmart each other either with the highest card value during confrontations, being the only one at the center of Mayhem or trying to bust your opponent’s card total in a battle of wits. The game just takes a few minutes to learn and set up, and only 10 minutes to get an entire game in, meaning it’s great to use to pass a few minutes, or to use while waiting for the latest hero movie to start.
Tim Bailey, Sara Blackburn, Preston Burt, Stephen Clark, Jeffrey Cohen, Adam Dimuzio, Mathias DeRider, Tom Fassbender, Luke Forney, Logan Giannini, Travis Hanson, Sean Hallenbeck, Michael Harrison, Kim Haynes, Whit Honea, Greg Howley, Michael J., Angela Leach, Michael LeSauvage, Jim MacQuarrie, Eric Parrish, Michael Pistiolas, Ricardo Rebelo, Drew Rich, Mitchell Roush, Mariana Ruiz, Tony Sims, Randy Slavey, Erik Stanfill, Andrew Terranova, Gerry Tolbert, Mark Vorenkamp, Shaun Washington, Chris Wickersham, Sean Z.
Stories in the series frequently emphasize the internal struggles, passions, and tragedies of the characters, and the main plot often recedes into the background as the focus shifts to their personal lives.[23][75] Games also explore relationships between characters, ranging from love to rivalry.[3] Other recurring situations that drive the plot include amnesia, a hero corrupted by an evil force, mistaken identity, and self-sacrifice.[3][76][77] Magical orbs and crystals are recurring in-game items that are frequently connected to the themes of the games' plots.[74] Crystals often play a central role in the creation of the world, and a majority of the Final Fantasy games link crystals and orbs to the planet's life force. As such, control over these crystals drives the main conflict.[74][78] The classical elements are also a recurring theme in the series related to the heroes, villains, and items.[74] Other common plot and setting themes include the Gaia hypothesis, an apocalypse, and conflicts between advanced technology and nature.[74][76][79]

Final Fantasy installments are generally stand-alone stories, each with different settings, plots and main characters, but the franchise is linked by several recurring elements, including game mechanics and recurring character names. Each plot centers on a particular group of heroes who are battling a great evil, but also explores the characters' internal struggles and relationships. Character names are frequently derived from the history, languages, pop culture, and mythologies of cultures worldwide. The mechanics of each game involve similar battle systems and maps.
‪Join Gloryhoundd, @DrGloryHogg and @GregcDickson as they navigate the #Kickstarter gauntlet by breaking down #KingdomRush , #VampirethemasqueradeHeritage #dungeonologytheexpedition and #Roam ‬ ‪❤️ Link in the Bio ❤️‬ ‪#BoardGame #Reviews for @luckyduckgames @nice.game.publishing @ludusmagnus.studio @redravengames . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #boardgame #gamenight #boardgameaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #boardgamesofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #brettspiele #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #dungeonology #vampirethemasquerade #crowdfunding #kickstarterboardgames #talkshow #
In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[93][94][95] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[94][96] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[97]
Overall I have to say I wasn’t disappointed with what I got. I was lucky enough not to get any duplicate games for my collection and one of the games was on my “to buy” list. I was also happy that these games came from game companies that I already like  to purchase from and were rated pretty well on Board Game Geek, however we have to talk about the “bad stuff” too.
This one is worth looking for. Exceptional friendly service, nice atmosphere. Our food was excellent - the bourbon burger made with dry-aged beef and pickled jalapenos was a wow. Pastrami is intensely pastrami and excellent. Try the bento box of multiple daily specials to get a good overview of what they offer. Pollo rico slider was a little dry but you could definitely taste the outdoor grilled flavor. The matchstick fries were a big hit at our table. I think a lot of people don't know this place is open yet or how to find it even though it's part of the Corndance building.  It's one of the best burger and casual food places in town and it's local. We'll be back, especially to try all the cool "hot dogs" which look like the now closed Hot Doug's in Chicago.
I’ve been reluctant to purchase a subscription to Board Game Bento because I already have so many board games at home and I was worried about getting duplicates while spending $60 on a bunch of games I didn’t really want. Don’t get me wrong, I think the idea is a fantastic one but I wasn’t sure if it was right for me, so I followed the Facebook Group for a bit and soon enough I found a theme I could get behind. “The Past”
I just received my first box. I signed up for the What's Cookin' box because the description said that it includes a game that sold out at Essen 2015. The only food related game that fit that description was Food Chain Magnate. I highly doubted that game would be included, but I figured I'd take a chance just in case it was. Shortly before the boxes were sent out I learned about Burger Boss and in one of the forums the publisher hinted that it would be in an upcoming BGB box. Sure enough it was, along with a Board Game Bento Secret Mission promo card, Foodfighters w/Foodfighters: the Grains Expansion and Sushi Go.
Wrath of Ashardalon is a fun game. Wrath of Ashardalon is the second d and d adventure system board game.The theme is more classic fantasy than Castle Ravenloft. The game is a bit easier too. Wrath has a campaign mode where you can complete multiple quests and carry over your characters. This is a neat addition. It plays much like Ravenloft, fun, fast, d and d light. The characters from each adventure system game can be used in all adventure system games and that is awesome.
And lastly is Eminent Domain from Tasty Minstrel Games. This is a deck-building game where players fight to control the most planets. You can approach your success through fighting or cultivation and it has a great flow to gameplay that offers plenty of options in how you respond to what your opponents are doing on their turns. Another keeper that appealed to everyone.
First time out and I was just whelmed. Came with a group for lunch since we work within walking distance. Based on location, I always figured pricing was going to be on the higher end and my suspisions were correct. I opted for a bento box cause it was moderately priced for a lunch special. Bento box came with chicken katsu, rice, miso soup, tempura, and side salad. Katsu and tempura was pretty dry but at least my water and soup was moist. They get 3 stars for friendly service and clean facilities. If I'm pressed for time and in dire need of sushi I'll come back and give them another shot.
Wormax.io is an eat-or-be-eaten multiplayer game. Strongly inspired by Slither.io, Wormax.io improves upon its predecessor in several big ways. Acceleration, Stop, and Ghost are three unlockable skills that make the gameplay much more dynamic and competitive. At any point during the game, players can slither over a multitude of boosters for extra health, vision, and magnetic abilities. Wormax.io also has excellent replay value, thanks to its unique “Artifact” currency and league system.

In 2005, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, a theatrical CGI film, and Last Order: Final Fantasy VII, a non-canon OVA,[48] were released as part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. Advent Children was animated by Visual Works, which helped the company create CG sequences for the games.[49] The film, unlike The Spirits Within, gained mixed to positive reviews from critics[50][51][52] and has become a commercial success.[53] Last Order, on the other hand, was released in Japan in a special DVD bundle package with Advent Children. Last Order sold out quickly[54] and was positively received by Western critics,[55][56] though fan reaction was mixed over changes to established story scenes.[57]
Best vegetarian sushi I have had ever...hands down!! What I love about this place is that we can customize the rolls. Usually tell them how many rolls we want, what veggies we don't want and if we want tempura style or with mayo etc. The rolls come out, always looking different and we have no idea what veggie combo is in them but they are always delicious!!
As for the quality of the games, they appear to come from experienced publishers. None of the games included generally have stellar ratings, but we would not call any of the titles “bad” games. They’re not the cream of the gaming crop, but they also don’t appear to be games that would get seriously negative ratings from us. That being said, one month’s game box included Walled City: Londonderry and Borderlands which happens to be one of my favorite games of all time.
The PlayStation console saw the release of three main Final Fantasy games. Final Fantasy VII (1997) moved away from the two-dimensional (2D) graphics used in the first six games to three-dimensional (3D) computer graphics; the game features polygonal characters on pre-rendered backgrounds. It also introduced a more modern setting, a style that was carried over to the next game.[3] It was also the second in the series to be released in Europe, with the first being Final Fantasy Mystic Quest. Final Fantasy VIII was published in 1999, and was the first to consistently use realistically proportioned characters and feature a vocal piece as its theme music.[3][13] Final Fantasy IX, released in 2000, returned to the series' roots by revisiting a more traditional Final Fantasy setting rather than the more modern worlds of VII and VIII.[3][14]

only reason I didn't go for it was whenever I start a project, I end up just paying an extra few dollars and buying a large assortment of whatever I need. so while buying 1 or 2 pcs of 5 or 6 different resistors is expensive, buying 2500 of 50 different kinds is relatively cheap in the long run after you do a few projects. I did the same thing with switches, leds, and other components.. so I wont really get anything out a subscription.. nor do I have the time to do a project a month.
When your dice won’t crit and you have to learn witchcraft to take matters into your own hands. #diceaddict with @polyherodice . . . . . . #boardgames #tabletop #familygames #familygamenight #boardgame #gamenight #boardgameaddict #fridaygamenight #uninvitedgamers #boardgamesofinstagram #tabletopgames #games #brettspiele #bgg #boardgamegeek #geek #geekculture #gloryhounddpresents #rpg #dice #criticalrole #witchcraft #roleplayinggames #dnd #dungeonsanddragons #dicelover #diced #fantasy

The Final Fantasy games feature a variety of music, and frequently reuse themes. Most of the games open with a piece called "Prelude", which has evolved from a simple, 2-voice arpeggio in the early games to a complex, melodic arrangement in recent installments.[23][73][95] Victories in combat are often accompanied by a victory fanfare, a theme that has become one of the most recognized pieces of music in the series. The basic theme that accompanies Chocobo appearances has been rearranged in a different musical style for each installment. A piece called "Prologue" (and sometimes "Final Fantasy"), originally featured in the first game, is often played during the ending credits.[73] Although leitmotifs are common in the more character-driven installments, theme music is typically reserved for main characters and recurring plot elements.[46]


I’ve been reluctant to purchase a subscription to Board Game Bento because I already have so many board games at home and I was worried about getting duplicates while spending $60 on a bunch of games I didn’t really want. Don’t get me wrong, I think the idea is a fantastic one but I wasn’t sure if it was right for me, so I followed the Facebook Group for a bit and soon enough I found a theme I could get behind. “The Past”


Funky Truck turns off-road driving into an arcade sport. This single-player racing game features delightfully cartoonish graphics and over-the-top physics. Players can bounce, flip, and even fly in their monster trucks. With limited time on the clock, driving at high speeds is a necessity. Funky Truck’s creatively designed levels are filled with towering hills, frightening valleys, and ramps galore. Guts, glory, and a passion for thrills are all it takes to win.
The game indeed reversed Square's lagging fortunes, and it became the company's flagship franchise.[46][94] Following the success, Square immediately developed a second installment. Because Sakaguchi assumed Final Fantasy would be a stand-alone game, its story was not designed to be expanded by a sequel. The developers instead chose to carry over only thematic similarities from its predecessor, while some of the gameplay elements, such as the character advancement system, were overhauled. This approach has continued throughout the series; each major Final Fantasy game features a new setting, a new cast of characters, and an upgraded battle system.[5] Video game writer John Harris attributed the concept of reworking the game system of each installment to Nihon Falcom's Dragon Slayer series,[98] with which Square was previously involved as a publisher.[99] The company regularly released new games in the main series. However, the time between the releases of Final Fantasy XI (2002), Final Fantasy XII (2006), and Final Fantasy XIII (2009) were much longer than previous games. Following Final Fantasy XIV, Square Enix stated that it intended to release Final Fantasy games either annually or biennially. This switch was to mimic the development cycles of Western games in the Call of Duty, Assassin's Creed and Battlefield series, as well as maintain fan-interest.[100]
I called 20min before closing to ask if they would still take a pickup order for sushi, and they kindly helped me out! Ordered 2 Rainbow Rolls, the order was prompt and ready when we came to pickup (within 10min of placing the order!). There was a generous amount of fish on top, nice thick slices of hamachi, tuna, ebi, salmon and halibut. The fish tasted very fresh, rice was well seasoned, the roll fillings were generous and fresh as well ...a quality sushi roll.:) The only negative is they didn't tell me the price over the phone, so I was slightly surprised at checkout. Their Rainbow Roll is a little more expensive here, compared to other sushi shops in the area - BUT the roll is large and the ingredient quality/fish freshness was great, so it's worth it imo. You get what you pay for! (In hindsight I normally would've asked, but I was rushing and forgot - hence I didn't mark a star down, as in my opinion it's just a note and not reflective of their service or food quality.)
MacKenzie Paulus, Megan Fulton, Tim Johnides, Jeff Williams, Dante Lauretta, Magnus Dahlsröm, Jayson Peters, David Michael, Gerry Tolbert, Andrew Smith, Ray Wehrs, Joel Becker, Scott Gaeta, Beth Kee, Joey Mills, talkie_tim, Danny Marquardt, Adam Bruski, John Bain, Bill Moore, Adam Frank, Lacey Hays, Peter Morson, James Needham, Matt Fleming, Adam Anderson, Jim Reynolds, Seiler Hagan, Bryan Wade, Petrov Neutrino, Jay Shapiro

wildlands board game

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