Three main installments, as well as one online game, were published for the PlayStation 2 (PS2).[15][16][17] Final Fantasy X (2001) introduced full 3D areas and voice acting to the series, and was the first to spawn a direct video game sequel (Final Fantasy X-2, published in 2003).[18][19] The first massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) in the series, Final Fantasy XI, was released on the PS2 and PC in 2002, and later on the Xbox 360.[20][21] It introduced real-time battles instead of random encounters.[21] Final Fantasy XII, published in 2006, also includes real-time battles in large, interconnected playfields.[22][23] The game is also the first in the main series to utilize a world used in a previous game, namely the land of Ivalice, which had previously featured in Final Fantasy Tactics and Vagrant Story.[24]
Following in the successful footsteps of Agar.io, Slither.io is essentially multiplayer Snake for the 21st century. Players begin as small snakes, and they must eat food (i.e. little blobs on the map) to grow. Larger snakes have an easier time trapping smaller ones and making them disappear. When an enemy snake gets trapped, it will become food for others. The simplicity of Slither.io makes it a great choice for quick, fun multiplayer gaming when bored. Plus, a broad selection of neon-colored skins results in eye-catching, pleasing graphics.
the only one I've ever saw that made sense was an electronics maker-esque kind of deal. if you were getting into messing around with audrinos, raspberry pis, breadboards, etc, it was pretty great. you got a bunch of resistors, leds, jumpers, boards, transistors, capacitors, motors, mini solar panels, etc and a bunch of practical and cool projects to do.

High Noon Saloon by Slug Fest Games: I enjoy a lot of Red Dragon Inn but I hadn’t heard of this one before. Luckily for me I have someone in the house who loves westerns, so the game was well received. After opening it I wasn’t super impressed with the bits but after doing a little more research I was happy to see it got a decent BGG rating. Which was a huge plus for a game I hadn’t heard of before that was published five years ago. I’m really hoping this game will be a diamond in the rough.
the only one I've ever saw that made sense was an electronics maker-esque kind of deal. if you were getting into messing around with audrinos, raspberry pis, breadboards, etc, it was pretty great. you got a bunch of resistors, leds, jumpers, boards, transistors, capacitors, motors, mini solar panels, etc and a bunch of practical and cool projects to do.

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the only one I've ever saw that made sense was an electronics maker-esque kind of deal. if you were getting into messing around with audrinos, raspberry pis, breadboards, etc, it was pretty great. you got a bunch of resistors, leds, jumpers, boards, transistors, capacitors, motors, mini solar panels, etc and a bunch of practical and cool projects to do.

In the mid-1980s, Square entered the Japanese video game industry with simple RPGs, racing games, and platformers for Nintendo's Famicom Disk System. In 1987, Square designer Hironobu Sakaguchi chose to create a new fantasy role-playing game for the cartridge-based NES, and drew inspiration from popular fantasy games: Enix's Dragon Quest, Nintendo's The Legend of Zelda, and Origin Systems's Ultima series. Though often attributed to the company allegedly facing bankruptcy, Sakaguchi explained that the game was his personal last-ditch effort in the game industry and that its title, Final Fantasy, stemmed from his feelings at the time; had the game not sold well, he would have quit the business and gone back to university.[93][94][95] Despite his explanation, publications have also attributed the name to the company's hopes that the project would solve its financial troubles.[94][96] In 2015, Sakaguchi explained the name's origin: the team wanted a title that would abbreviate to "FF", which would sound good in Japanese. The name was originally going to be Fighting Fantasy, but due to concerns over trademark conflicts with the roleplaying gamebook series of the same name, they needed to settle for something else. As the word "Final" was a famous word in Japan, Sakaguchi settled on that. According to Sakaguchi, any title that created the "FF" abbreviation would have done.[97]

This can make sense from a business point of view, but it is unfortunate in any event.  I am guessing part of the problem was getting the news of the product to its target audience.  Local gaming shops, for the most part, aren’t going to recommend essentially buying games from someone else, even if it is cheaper.  Gamers like myself with a large library (not to mention having to pay overseas shipping) are worried about spending big money on games we already have – it’s a bit of a hit and miss scenario.


The biggest game in the box belongs to Heroes Wanted by Action Phase Games. The game, for one to five players, has players making their heroes using a pair of cards, with strengths and weaknesses, as well as a unique quirk. Players then take on villains, minions and each other to become the hero with the most fame at the end of the game. The game features quite a few scenarios to try as well. Between the scenarios and the variety of heroes you can become, Heroes Wanted will offer quite a bit of replay.

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